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I am working on making a python program that fetches data from a website then records it in a text file. I want this to record the last 1000 (I am testing with 4 and a string "hello") entries and delete the rest. Here is what I have so far:

f = open("test.txt", "r")
text = f.read()

f = open("test.txt", "w")
content = text.splitlines(True)
f.write("hello")
f.write("\n")

for x in range(0,4):
    f.write(str(content[x:x+1]).strip('[]'))

f.close()

This "works" however formats the text file like this:

hello
'hello\n''\'hello\\n\'\'\\\'hello\\\\n\\\'\\\'\\\\\\\'hello\\\\\\\\n\\\\\\\'"\\\\\\\'hello\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\n\\\\\\\'"\\\'\''

Can you help me figure this out so it looks like this:

hello
hello
hello
hello

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
You want the last 1000 non blank lines? I'm not sure you filtering scheme here. –  GWW Oct 9 '13 at 22:52
    
Do you realize, you open the file first for reading, and then, without closing it, you try to open it again for writing? I propose to add f.close() to line 3 and see, if the situation improves. And to keep the code clear, the content = text.splitlines(True) would fit better before opening the file for writing. –  Jan Vlcinsky Oct 9 '13 at 23:04
    
I changed it to this: f = open("test.txt", "r") text = f.read() content = text.splitlines(True) f.close() f = open("test.txt", "w") f.write("hello") f.write("\n") for x in range(0,4): f.write(str(content[x:x+1]).strip('[]')) f.close() and there was no improvement. –  pclever1 Oct 9 '13 at 23:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use deque, as it offers maxlen. Adding lines/words will keep only maxlen items, new items will be added and older ones forgotten.

from collections import deque
fname = "source.txt"
last_lines = deque(maxlen = 4)
with open(fname) as f:
  text = f.read()
  for line in text.splitlines(True):
    last_lines.append(line)
#f is closed when we leave the block 

outfname = fname
with open(outfname, "w") as of:
  for line in last_lines:
    of.write(line)

You may do it even without splitlines (but you asked for it).

from collections import deque
fname = "source.txt"
last_lines = deque(maxlen = 4)
for line in open(fname):
  last_lines.append(line)
#file is closed when we leave the (for) block

outfname = fname
with open(outfname, "w") as of:
  for line in last_lines:
    of.write(line)

And using the trick from Jon Clements (create deque using iterator made from file descriptor) and allowing oneself to use different source and target files, it can get really short:

from collections import deque
with open("target.txt", "w") as out_f:
  for line in deque(open("source.txt"), maxlen = 4):
    out_f.write(line)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it works great! –  pclever1 Oct 9 '13 at 23:31

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