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I'm working on a project to create a screen saver that draws random shapes. I have a few questions, but my main concern right now is how to get the shapes to stay on the screen and not just disappear after they are created. Here is my code. I cannot use any loops and I am not looking to change any of the functionality of what I have yet (other than possibly shapesDrawn).

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;

public class ScreenSaver2 extends JPanel implements ActionListener {
    private JFrame frame = new JFrame("FullSize");
    private Rectangle rectangle;
    boolean full;


    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        int r = (int)(Math.random() * 255);
        int gr = (int)(Math.random() * 255);
        int b = (int)(Math.random() * 255);
        Color color = new Color(r, gr, b);
        int width = 10 + (int)(Math.random() * 40);
        int height = 10 + (int)(Math.random() * 40);
        int x = (int)(Math.random() * (getWidth() - width));
        int y = (int)(Math.random() * (getHeight() - height));
        int whichShape = (int)(Math.random() * 3);
        int shapesDrawn = 0;

        super.paintComponent(g);
        if (shapesDrawn >= 30) {
            shapesDrawn = 0;
        }

        switch (whichShape) {
        case 0:
            g.setColor(color);
            g.drawLine(x, y, x + width, y + height);
            shapesDrawn++;
            break;
        case 1:
            g.setColor(color);
            g.drawRect(x, y, width, height);
            shapesDrawn++;
            break;
        case 2:
            g.setColor(color);
            g.drawRoundRect(x, y, width, height, 25, 25);
            shapesDrawn++;
            break;
        case 3:
            g.setColor(color);
            g.drawOval(x, y, width, height);
            shapesDrawn++;
            break;
        }

    }


    ScreenSaver2() {
        // Remove the title bar, min, max, close stuff
        frame.setUndecorated(true);
        // Add a Key Listener to the frame
        frame.addKeyListener(new KeyHandler());
        // Add this panel object to the frame
        frame.add(this);
        // Get the dimensions of the screen
        rectangle = GraphicsEnvironment.getLocalGraphicsEnvironment()
        .getDefaultScreenDevice().getDefaultConfiguration().getBounds();
        // Set the size of the frame to the size of the screen
        frame.setSize(rectangle.width, rectangle.height);
        frame.setVisible(true);
        // Remember that we are currently at full size
        full = true;
        // set and initialize timer
        Timer t = new Timer(500, this);
        t.setDelay(500);
        t.start();

    }

    // This method will run when any key is pressed in the window
    class KeyHandler extends KeyAdapter {
        public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
            // Terminate the program.
            if (e.getKeyChar() == 'x') {
                System.out.println("Exiting");
                System.exit(0);
            }
            // Change background color
            else if (e.getKeyChar() == 'r') {
                System.out.println("Change background color");
                setBackground(new Color((int)(Math.random() * 256), (int)(Math.random() * 256), (int)(Math.random() * 256)));
                repaint();
            }
            // Resize to half-screen
            else if (e.getKeyChar() == 'z') {
                System.out.println("Resizing");
                frame.setSize((int)rectangle.getWidth() / 2, (int)rectangle.getHeight());
            }
        }
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        repaint();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ScreenSaver2 obj = new ScreenSaver2();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why can't you use loops? –  nhgrif Oct 10 '13 at 0:15
    
@nhgrif It's a restriction of the stupid assignment :P –  MadProgrammer Oct 10 '13 at 0:15
    
you are continuously calling repaint() with random shape, yet you want to keep the old paint. ~^ –  Sage Oct 10 '13 at 0:22
    
something like public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { if (shapesDrawn >= 30) { shapesDrawn = 0; repaint(); } –  Ryel Oct 10 '13 at 0:31
    
@Ryel, FWIW you should have your prof take a look at Custom Painting Approaches for the normal way to do something like this. These examples should be modified to have an "addShape()" method which would either add a Shape to the ArrayList or paint the Shape on the BufferedImage. Then your Timer would just invoke the addShape() method with a new shape. –  camickr Oct 10 '13 at 1:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Rather than painting each new shape within the paintComponent directly to the Graphics context, use a backing buffer to render the shapes to first and paint this to the Graphics context.

This way, you would simply need to maintain a simple counter each time a new shape is rendered.

This is also troublesome, because paintComponent may be called for any number of reasons, which, you don't control many, meaning that it would be possible for your program to paint more shapes before any timer ticks have actually occurred...

Updated with example

The only choice you have left is to create a backing buffer, onto which you can paint each change as required. This will "store" each change between paint cycles. You could then simply paint this to the screen...

private BufferedImage img;

//...

@Override
protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    super.paintComponent(g);
    Graphics2D g2d = (Graphics2D) g.create();
    // Create the backing buffer
    // This is a little cheat, creating a new image when the number of shapes
    // exceeds the requirements, but it saves messing about with clearing
    // a alpha image ;)
    if (img == null || shapesDrawn >= 30) {
        img = new BufferedImage(getWidth(), getHeight(), BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB);
        shapesDrawn = 0;
    } else if (img.getWidth() != getWidth() || img.getHeight() != img.getHeight()) {
        // Update the backing buffer to meet the requirements of the changed screen size...
        BufferedImage buffer = new BufferedImage(getWidth(), getHeight(), BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB);
        Graphics2D gbuffer = buffer.createGraphics();
        gbuffer.drawImage(img, 0, 0, this);
        gbuffer.dispose();
        img = buffer;
    }

    // Get a reference to the backing buffers graphics context...
    Graphics2D gbuffer = img.createGraphics();

    // Paint the shapes to the backing buffer...
    int r = (int) (Math.random() * 255);
    int gr = (int) (Math.random() * 255);
    int b = (int) (Math.random() * 255);
    Color color = new Color(r, gr, b);
    int width = 10 + (int) (Math.random() * 40);
    int height = 10 + (int) (Math.random() * 40);
    int x = (int) (Math.random() * (getWidth() - width));
    int y = (int) (Math.random() * (getHeight() - height));
    int whichShape = (int) (Math.random() * 3);
    int shapesDrawn = 0;

    switch (whichShape) {
        case 0:
            gbuffer.setColor(color);
            gbuffer.drawLine(x, y, x + width, y + height);
            shapesDrawn++;
            break;
        case 1:
            gbuffer.setColor(color);
            gbuffer.drawRect(x, y, width, height);
            shapesDrawn++;
            break;
        case 2:
            gbuffer.setColor(color);
            gbuffer.drawRoundRect(x, y, width, height, 25, 25);
            shapesDrawn++;
            break;
        case 3:
            gbuffer.setColor(color);
            gbuffer.drawOval(x, y, width, height);
            shapesDrawn++;
            break;
    }
    // Dispose of the buffers graphics context, this frees up memory for us
    gbuffer.dispose();
    // Paint the image to the screen...
    g2d.drawImage(img, 0, 0, this);
    g2d.dispose();
}

Possibly the worst advice I've ever had to give

Change...

super.paintComponent(g);
if (shapesDrawn >= 30) {
    shapesDrawn = 0;
}

To...

if (shapesDrawn >= 30) {
    super.paintComponent(g);
    shapesDrawn = 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I spoke with my professor this morning and he specifically said to move everything into the paintComponent. It is working, but the shapes won't stay on the screen which means I don't know if the counter is working. –  Ryel Oct 10 '13 at 0:27
    
also @MadProgrammer it was frustrating because I basically had to trash everything you helped me with lol –  Ryel Oct 10 '13 at 0:27
    
Every time paintComponent is called, it will clear the graphics context, this is the expected functionality. With out a loop, the only choice you have is to paint the output to a backing buffer first before painting it to the screen... –  MadProgrammer Oct 10 '13 at 0:28
    
Oh do you mean to draw the shapes, and number them and then initialize the switch component? –  Ryel Oct 10 '13 at 0:28
2  
@Ryel That is possibly some of the stupidest advice I've ever heard. The Graphics context is a shared resource, meaning that anything that was painted before you component will still be "visible" on it, that's the point of calling super.paintComponent. I don't care if there is nothing else on the screen, this is encouraging bad practices that will turn around and bite you on the rear end quicker than you can blink - Take it from someone who's being coding with swing professional for more than 14 years ;) –  MadProgrammer Oct 10 '13 at 0:52

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