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I'm very new to OpenGL. I have a simple program that allows me to have once bouncing ball. Do you know how I can tweek the code to have two or more balls bounce (using multithreads)? I'm also supposed to have the balls bounce off each other should a collision occur. Here is the code I have for one bouncing ball.

/*
 * GL07BouncingBall.cpp: A ball bouncing inside the window
 */
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
using namespace std;

#include <windows.h>  // for MS Windows
#include <GL/glut.h>  // GLUT, includes glu.h and gl.h
#include <Math.h>     // Needed for sin, cos
#define PI 3.14159265f

// Global variables
char title[] = "Bouncing Ball (2D)";  // Windowed mode's title
int windowWidth  = 640;     // Windowed mode's width
int windowHeight = 480;     // Windowed mode's height
int windowPosX   = 50;      // Windowed mode's top-left corner x
int windowPosY   = 50;      // Windowed mode's top-left corner y

GLfloat ballRadius = 0.2f;   // Radius of the bouncing ball
GLfloat ballX = 0.0f;         // Ball's center (x, y) position
GLfloat ballY = 0.0f;
GLfloat ballXMax, ballXMin, ballYMax, ballYMin; // Ball's center (x, y) bounds
GLfloat xSpeed = 0.02f;      // Ball's speed in x and y directions
GLfloat ySpeed = 0.007f;
int refreshMillis = 30;      // Refresh period in milliseconds

// Projection clipping area
GLdouble clipAreaXLeft, clipAreaXRight, clipAreaYBottom, clipAreaYTop;

/* Initialize OpenGL Graphics */
void initGL() {
   glClearColor(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0); // Set background (clear) color to black
}

/* Callback handler for window re-paint event */
void display() {
   glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);  // Clear the color buffer
   glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);    // To operate on the model-view matrix
   glLoadIdentity();              // Reset model-view matrix

   glTranslatef(ballX, ballY, 0.0f);  // Translate to (xPos, yPos)
   // Use triangular segments to form a circle
   glBegin(GL_TRIANGLE_FAN);
      glColor3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);  // Blue
      glVertex2f(0.0f, 0.0f);       // Center of circle
      int numSegments = 100;
      GLfloat angle;
      for (int i = 0; i <= numSegments; i++) { // Last vertex same as first vertex
         angle = i * 2.0f * PI / numSegments;  // 360 deg for all segments
         glVertex2f(cos(angle) * ballRadius, sin(angle) * ballRadius);
      }
   glEnd();

   glutSwapBuffers();  // Swap front and back buffers (of double buffered mode)

   // Animation Control - compute the location for the next refresh
   ballX += xSpeed;
   ballY += ySpeed;
   // Check if the ball exceeds the edges
   if (ballX > ballXMax) {
      ballX = ballXMax;
      xSpeed = -xSpeed;
   } else if (ballX < ballXMin) {
      ballX = ballXMin;
      xSpeed = -xSpeed;
   }
   if (ballY > ballYMax) {
      ballY = ballYMax;
      ySpeed = -ySpeed;
   } else if (ballY < ballYMin) {
      ballY = ballYMin;
      ySpeed = -ySpeed;
   }
}

/* Call back when the windows is re-sized */
void reshape(GLsizei width, GLsizei height) {
   // Compute aspect ratio of the new window
   if (height == 0) height = 1;                // To prevent divide by 0
   GLfloat aspect = (GLfloat)width / (GLfloat)height;

   // Set the viewport to cover the new window
   glViewport(0, 0, width, height);

   // Set the aspect ratio of the clipping area to match the viewport
   glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);  // To operate on the Projection matrix
   glLoadIdentity();             // Reset the projection matrix
   if (width >= height) {
      clipAreaXLeft   = -1.0 * aspect;
      clipAreaXRight  = 1.0 * aspect;
      clipAreaYBottom = -1.0;
      clipAreaYTop    = 1.0;
   } else {
      clipAreaXLeft   = -1.0;
      clipAreaXRight  = 1.0;
      clipAreaYBottom = -1.0 / aspect;
      clipAreaYTop    = 1.0 / aspect;
   }
   gluOrtho2D(clipAreaXLeft, clipAreaXRight, clipAreaYBottom, clipAreaYTop);
   ballXMin = clipAreaXLeft + ballRadius;
   ballXMax = clipAreaXRight - ballRadius;
   ballYMin = clipAreaYBottom + ballRadius;
   ballYMax = clipAreaYTop - ballRadius;
}

/* Called back when the timer expired */
void Timer(int value) {
   glutPostRedisplay();    // Post a paint request to activate display()
   glutTimerFunc(refreshMillis, Timer, 0); // subsequent timer call at milliseconds
}

/* Main function: GLUT runs as a console application starting at main() */
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
   glutInit(&argc, argv);            // Initialize GLUT
   glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_DOUBLE); // Enable double buffered mode
   glutInitWindowSize(windowWidth, windowHeight);  // Initial window width and height
   glutInitWindowPosition(windowPosX, windowPosY); // Initial window top-left corner (x, y)
   glutCreateWindow(title);      // Create window with given title

   glutDisplayFunc(display);     // Register callback handler for window re-paint
   glutReshapeFunc(reshape);     // Register callback handler for window re-shape
   glutTimerFunc(0, Timer, 0);   // First timer call immediately
   initGL();                     // Our own OpenGL initialization
   glutMainLoop();               // Enter event-processing loop
   return 0;
}

**Edit: I've added improvements to my code. I've now created two balls, each with its own speed, color, and center. Although, the two balls remain static. The function in which I create the balls is defined by:

void create(double s, GLfloat ballRadius, GLfloat ballX, GLfloat ballY, GLfloat xSpeed, GLfloat ySpeed)//, double r, double t)
{
    //ballRadius = f; 
    //xSpeed = r;
    //ySpeed = t;


    glTranslatef(ballX, ballY, 0.0f);  // Translate to (xPos, yPos)
      glBegin(GL_TRIANGLE_FAN);
      glColor3f(s, 0.0f, 1.0f);  // Blue
      glVertex2f(0.0, 0.0f);       // Center of circle
      int numSegments = 100;
      GLfloat angle;
      for (int i = 0; i <= numSegments; i++) { // Last vertex same as first vertex
         angle = i * 2.0f * PI / numSegments;  // 360 deg for all segments
         glVertex2f(cos(angle) * ballRadius, sin(angle) * ballRadius);
      }
   glEnd();

   // Animation Control - compute the location for the next refresh
   ballX += xSpeed;
   ballY += ySpeed;
   // Check if the ball exceeds the edges
   if (ballX > ballXMax) {
      ballX = ballXMax;
      xSpeed = -xSpeed;
   } else if (ballX < ballXMin) {
      ballX = ballXMin;
      xSpeed = -xSpeed;
   }
   if (ballY > ballYMax) {
      ballY = ballYMax;
      ySpeed = -ySpeed;
   } else if (ballY < ballYMin) {
      ballY = ballYMin;
      ySpeed = -ySpeed;
   }
}

And I call this function by:

create(1.0, 0.2f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.02f, 0.007f);
create(0.0, 0.1f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.04f, 0.014f);

for two separate balls

share|improve this question
3  
Why do you want to use threads? What particular part of the problem are you stuck on? Please be more specific with your question and reduce it to the essentials. Right now it's too broad. –  GManNickG Oct 10 '13 at 0:48
1  
dude, you can't "tweak" this code, you need to implement: a. collision detection b. threads. Start by looking into Circle-Circle Intersection –  Andrew Douglas Oct 10 '13 at 0:53
    
I want to use threads in order to create several balls. Basically, I want to have a function that one creates the ball. Everytime I want to add a ball, I will create a thread that will call that function. So for every ball I have, I will have a corresponding thread. And what I'm stuck on is what part of the code I have to extract in order to just simply create the ball, and put that in a void function on its own. –  John Oct 10 '13 at 1:14
1  
@John: That is actually a terrible way to handle the bouncing balls logic. Threads are resource-intensive from both a CPU and OS perspective. It takes a long time for the OS to provision new threads and the OS has to schedule the threads for execution. Not to mention you almost certainly have to deal with synchronization issues, which further reduces performance. A much better way is to use one thread to handle all the physics and another to handle the rendering, for example. –  In silico Oct 10 '13 at 2:37
1  
@John: Incorporating threads isn't the hard part, I promise you that. Having the threads cooperate and do their jobs while not totally slowing down your machine is the hard part. :-) –  In silico Oct 10 '13 at 2:51
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1 Answer 1

This code "creates" a circle

// Use triangular segments to form a circle
       glBegin(GL_TRIANGLE_FAN);
          glColor3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);  // Blue
          glVertex2f(0.0f, 0.0f);       // Center of circle
          int numSegments = 100;
          GLfloat angle;
          for (int i = 0; i <= numSegments; i++) { // Last vertex same as first vertex
             angle = i * 2.0f * PI / numSegments;  // 360 deg for all segments
             glVertex2f(cos(angle) * ballRadius, sin(angle) * ballRadius);
          }
       glEnd();
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This helps a lot! What I don't understand however is where I would implement that in the code in order to create a second ball. Because I've tried to create a second function "display 2" with different variables for the ball (Ball2x, Ball2Y etc), and tried to call on that function with glutDisplayFunc(display2), but I'm not getting it right. –  John Oct 10 '13 at 1:21
    
start small, add the same code in my answer below glEnd(); in your original code but change the circle center position and see what you get –  Andrew Douglas Oct 10 '13 at 1:31
    
Thank you for answering! Although, what do I do with the variables that were already declared? Such as angle and numSegments? I changed them to angle2 and numSegments2 respectively to see what I would get. All I got was a ball with a cone sticking out of it. And when you say change the circle center position, you mean the "glVertex2f(0.0f, 0.0f)"? I put it to glVertex2f(1.0f, 1.0f). –  John Oct 10 '13 at 1:35
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