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I'm new to OCaml, and trying to write some basic functions.

I found the find_new function(this function is basically finding a list of elements that only appear in the first list) doesn't work if I use curry2 to define it.

let curry2 f (x,y) = f x y

let flip f x y = f y x

let compose f g x = g (f x)
let rec elem v xs = match xs with
         [] -> false
       | (h::t) -> if v = h then true else elem v t

let rec filter fb l = match l with
    [] -> []
  | (h::t) -> if fb h
                then h::(filter fb t)
                else (filter fb t)

let x = [5;6;7;3] ;;
let y = [5;6;7;5] ;;
let z = [7;5;6;5] ;;
let a = [3;5;8;9] ;;

let find_new_ xs ys = filter (compose ((flip elem) ys) not) xs ;;
let find_new (xs,ys) = find_new_ xs ys;; (* works *)
(* let find_new = curry2 find_new_;; *)  (* doesn't work *)

find_new (x,[3]);;
find_new (x,[3;5]);;
find_new (x,[3;6]);;
find_new ([x;y;z],[y]);;
find_new ([x;y;z],[y;x]);;

if I use the second definition of find_new (one that commented out), the error info was:

Error: This expression has type int list
       but an expression was expected of type int

So I'm wondering what's wrong with my code?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This looks like the value restriction. Try defining with eta expansion

let find_new pair = curry2 find_new_ pair

See the OCaml FAQ A function obtained through partial application is not polymorphic enough.

share|improve this answer
    
Is the "value restriction" the same thing as the "monomorphism restriction" in Haskell? –  Chris Taylor Oct 10 '13 at 8:09
    
No, it's a different restriction. Haskell doesn't need the value restriction because it doesn't have "side effects". –  Jeffrey Scofield Oct 10 '13 at 8:11

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