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I have a method to check and make sure my SQL server is online, which I use in some connection sensitive parts of my code.

Although it works fine, I notice it takes upto 20ms to run, and I was wondering if anyone knows of a better way of checking SQL server to ensure its up and kicking.

Here is my existing code.

[System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Design", "CA1031:DoNotCatchGeneralExceptionTypes")]
        public static bool IsSqlServerOnline(string connectionString)
        {
#if DEBUG || DEBUG_SINGLE_CORE
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            sw.Start();
#endif

#if DEBUG || DEBUG_SINGLE_CORE
            // This sould only occur of we are in the VSTS designer
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(connectionString))
            {
                return false;
            }
#endif

            if ( !NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable() )
            {
                return false;
            }

            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(connectionString)) throw new ArgumentNullException("connectionString");

            bool isSqlServerOnline = false;
            SqlConnectionStringBuilder conString = new SqlConnectionStringBuilder(connectionString);

            try
            {
                using (Ping p = new Ping())
                {
                    string sqlSvr = conString.DataSource;
                    if (sqlSvr != null)
                        isSqlServerOnline = p.Send(sqlSvr).Status == IPStatus.Success;
                }
            }
            catch (PingException)
            {
                isSqlServerOnline = false;
            }

            if ( isSqlServerOnline )
            {
                try 
                {
                    conString.ConnectTimeout = 3;
                    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(conString.ToString()))
                    {
                        conn.Open();
                        isSqlServerOnline = true;
                    }
                }
                catch ( Exception )
                {
                    isSqlServerOnline = false;
                }
            }

#if DEBUG || DEBUG_SINGLE_CORE
            sw.Stop();
            Trace.WriteLine(string.Format("IsSqlServerOnline: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds));
#endif
            return isSqlServerOnline;
        }
share|improve this question
1  
20ms is pretty darn quick; is that a significant part of your page times, or are you calling this an awful lot? –  Dean J Dec 18 '09 at 16:01
    
20ms doesn't seem that bad. Consider, you are making a connction, getting a response, and colsing the connection -- all over the network. I think you'll find it hard to do something faster... but I could be wrong. –  Nate Dec 18 '09 at 16:02
    
20 ms isn't very long, especially if you're hitting the network. –  Benoit Dec 18 '09 at 16:03
    
Compared to some of my other response times, no this isn't a lot. It does get called a lot, though, and I am on a kick right now to reduce my latency times, if even a little. Death by a thousand paper cuts and all. –  Russ Dec 18 '09 at 16:05
    
If 20ms is the best I can hope for, then so be-it. I was just curious to see who brings a sandwich, if anyone, when I run this flag up the pole. –  Russ Dec 18 '09 at 16:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As others have mentioned, the 20ms barrier is probably not anything to worry about. However, I might ask how often the code gets called? Would it be sufficient to cache the result of the call for 3-5 seconds (or even just 2-3)? instead of accessing the network each time? 2-3 seconds is a pretty small cache window, and there's nothing to say that a "server alive" check couldn't return OK only to have the server crash in the middle of the code executing anyway. If all you're wasting is 20 ms every few seconds (at most), that's hardly anything to worry about.

share|improve this answer
    
Typicly when I call this code, its called in lumps, so I get a lot of calls, then nothing for a while. I like your idea of caching, and I put in a 10 second cache, which I will tweak based on production observations over time. Looks like I just the time down to around 5ms by using the cache just after the check if the PC itself has network available. –  Russ Dec 18 '09 at 16:54

Your code checks if you are able to establish a connection to the SQL Server. You may also be interested in taking it one step further and verifying that it is responding to queries by running something like

Select @@version
share|improve this answer

You could use the Windows service control manager API:

  1. Call OpenSCManager (has hostname as parameter)
  2. Call OpenService
  3. Call QueryServiceStatus

If the status is SERVICE_RUNNING, the service is up.

If you're not into P/Invoke, have a look at System.ServiceProcess.ServiceController. The function

public ServiceController(string name, string machineName)

looks like it might be used to retrieve the status of a specific service.

share|improve this answer
    
I use this function in other parts of my code, and I have found that if your not an admin on the box your calling, it will crash. –  Russ Dec 18 '09 at 16:28
    
Yes, you need admin rights to control services. I'd expect it to return ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED instead of crashing. In addition, firewalls could block the ports used by these function calls –  Andomar Dec 18 '09 at 16:31
    
Your probibly right in that it likly does return that error, but it does so in the form of a Win32Exception. If not handeled is a crash, and if handeled, in this case, gets me no where, because I won't know the state of the service anyway. –  Russ Dec 18 '09 at 16:58

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