Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So as my question asked: is $.ajax() jQuery's way of shortening the normal code (These are both different examples, because my question is just regarding the structure) is

  $.ajax(
        {url:"index.php/a", 
        type:"POST",
        contentType:"application/json; charset=utf-8",
                    data:{some_string:"blabla"},
        dataType:"json",
        success:function(data){
            alert(data);
            },
        error:function(a,b,c){
            }
        });

the same as

function loadXMLDoc()
{
var xmlhttp;
if (window.XMLHttpRequest)
  {// code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
  xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
  }
else
  {// code for IE6, IE5
  xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
  }
xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
  {
  if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200)
    {
    document.getElementById("myDiv").innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
    }
  }
xmlhttp.open("GET","ajax_info.txt",true);
xmlhttp.send();
}
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not exactly the same, but yes it's basically serving the same purpose. (there are significant differences between the functionality of the two examples though, not least of which is that one is sending a POST request and the other a GET request)

I would suggest taking a look at the (uncompressed) source code for jQuery to see what the $.ajax() function does. It is quite a lot more complex than your raw XMLHttpRequest code, but yes it does do basically the same job, and at the core of it, it does call the same XMLHttpRequest class.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.