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I have a C++ class hierarchy that looks something like this:

class A;

class B
{
public:
    B( A& a ) : a_( a )
    {
    };

private:
    A& a_;
};

class MyObject
{
public:
    MyObject() : b_( a_ )
    {
    };

private:
    A a_;
    B b_;
};

Occasionally, it will happen that in B's destructor I will get invalid access exceptions relating to its reference of A. It appears that A is destroyed before B.

Is there something inherently wrong with using class members to initialize other members? Is there no guarantee of the order of destruction?

Thanks, PaulH

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1  
Is this the whole code that gives you segfaults upon destruction? Can you show us main()? –  rui Dec 18 '09 at 16:28
    
The problem is the compiler generaqted copy constructor. See my answer below for details. –  Loki Astari Dec 18 '09 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

EDIT: I missed the MyObject part of your question so my original answer will probably not be of much help. I guess your problem lies in the code you did not post, the stripped-down example should work fine.


Class B does not “own” the object passed by reference, therefore the objects a and b have different life cycles. If the object refered to by B::a_ is destroyed, B's destructor will access an invalid reference.

Some code to explain what I mean:

class A;

class B {
public:
    B(A a) : a_(a) {}  // a is copied to a_
    ~B() { /* Access a_ */ }
private:
    A a_;
};

class C {
public:
    C(A& a) : a_(a) {}  // a_ is a reference (implicit pointer)
                        // of an external object.
    ~C() { /* Access a_ */ }
private:
    A& a_;
};


int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    A* a = new A();

    B b(*a);
    C c(*a);

    delete a;
    // Now b has a valid copy of a, c has an invalid reference.
}
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Hum, did you mean to have a destructor in B that was doing something to A? –  rui Dec 18 '09 at 16:27
1  
Construction order follows declaration order, and destruction order is reversed. In the MyObject example, this means that a_ should be constructed before b_, and a_ should be destroyed after b_. IOWs, you're right that B, as defined, does not own a_ but, MyObject, as defined, should guarantee proper construction and destruction order. –  Éric Malenfant Dec 18 '09 at 16:29
    
@Eric: You are right, I missed the MyObject detail. –  Ferdinand Beyer Dec 18 '09 at 16:33
    
Yup, I agree with Eric, I don't see a problem a with the code in the Question - Members in MyObject are declared in the correct order so that it never crashes. –  rui Dec 18 '09 at 16:36
    
The problem must be elsewhere. Thanks for confirming. –  PaulH Dec 18 '09 at 17:41

In the code above the destruction order is well defined.
The destruction order is the reverse of the creation order.
The creation order is the order the members were declared within the class.
So in this case:

Default Construction:
  a_:  constructed first using default constructor.
  b_:  constructed using a valid a_ passed to the constructor.

Destruction:
  b_:   destroyed first. The destructor can use the reference to a 
        As long as the object has not been copied (see below)
  a_:   destroyed second.

But you have a potential problem if you make a copy of the object using the copy constructor.

The following copy constructor is defined by the compiler:

MyObject::MyObject(MyObject const& copy)
    :a_(copy.a_)
    ,b_(copy.b_)
{}

So you may have a potential problem here. As the copy will contain an object 'b_' that contains a reference that was copied from another object. If the other object is destroyed then this 'b_' will have an invalid reference.

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a_ should be constructed before b_, and b_ should be destructed before a_, based on the order you have defined them in MyObject.

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