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In this code:

class A
  @@a = 0
  def initialize
      @@a = @@a + 1
  end

  def to_s
    @@a
  end
end

a = A.new
p a
b = A.new
p b

The output is 1 and 2. But if I remove the def initialize ... end and have @@a = @@a + 1 immediately after @@a = 0 on the third line, then the output is 1 and 1. I know that after initializing an object, the initialize method executes as the first method after calling A.new, but I'm not really sure how the class variable @@a is being handled.

Why doesn't the @@a variable auto-increment when I have @@a = @@a + 1 not wrapped inside the initialize method? I mean, it makes sense for it to increment, because after you call A.new, @@a = 0, and @@a = @@a + 1 => 1 = 0 + 1. Then for b = A.new, you repeat and get 2. This doesn't happen for some reason and I'm not sure why.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's because the code in body of the class is executed once - when class is loaded. So @@a class variable increments only once.

On the other hand, the code in initialize method runs every time you call A.new.

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Ruby is executing your file from top to bottom.

In the version with the initialize function, Ruby (roughly speaking):

  1. Enters the class definition
  2. Defines the class variable @@a, and assigns it 0
  3. Defines the initialize function and the to_s function
  4. Creates a new A, running initialize and incrementing @@a to 1
  5. Creates a new A, running initialize and incrementing @@a to 2

In the version with the @@a not in a function:

  1. Enters the class definition
  2. Defines the class variable @@a, and assigns it 0
  3. Increments the class variable @@a to 1
  4. Defines the to_s function
  5. Creates a new A, running no initializer
  6. Creates a new A, running no initializer

So @@a is only incremented once - when Ruby executes the code in the class definition.

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