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IF in a string there is a character or characters that occurs again and again. Like in the following string:

1+1+1-2+2/2*4-2*3/23

Now in the string above the + occurs 3 times at the indexes of 1,3,7 and - occurs 2 times at the indexes of 5,13 and so others, and then storing them in 2 dimensional array So now the issue is that how to do this.

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1  
How to do what? Find it, count it, replace it? –  Henk Holterman Oct 10 '13 at 11:00
1  
Do you want to count the signs or do you need the indexes of them? –  HimBromBeere Oct 10 '13 at 11:02
1  
@HenkHolterman I don't want to replace it, I just want to store it. –  mega6382 Oct 10 '13 at 11:03
1  
@HimBromBeere I want to store the signs and there indexes in an array. –  mega6382 Oct 10 '13 at 11:04
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The following function will return all matched indices for a given search string:

List<int> GetAllIndices(string input, string search)
{
    List<int> result = new List<int>();

    int index = input.IndexOf(search);

    while(index != -1)
    {
        result.Add(index);
        index++;//increment to avoid matching the same index again
        if(index >= input.Length)//check if index is greater than string (causes exception)
            break;
        index = input.IndexOf(search, index);
    }

    return result;
}

It should also handle overlapping matches, for example: searching "iii" for occurrences of "ii" will return [0,1]


If you want to use this function to create a list of symbols and their indices then I would recommend the following approach:

string input = "1+1+1-2+2/2*4-2*3/23";

//create a dictionary to store the results
Dictionary<string, List<int>> results = new Dictionary<string, List<int>>();

//add results for + symbol
results.Add("+", GetAllIndices(input, "+"));

//add results for - symbol
results.Add("-", GetAllIndices(input, "-"));

//you can then access all indices for a given symbol like so
foreach(int index in results["+"])
{
    //do something with index
}

You could even go a step further and wrap that in a function that searches for multiple symbols:

Dictionary<string, List<int>> GetSymbolMatches(string input, params string[] symbols)
{
    Dictionary<string, List<int>> results = new Dictionary<string, List<int>>();

    foreach(string symbol in symbols)
    {
        results.Add(symbol, GetAllIndices(input, symbol));
    }

    return results;
}

Which you can then use like so:

string input = "1+1+1-2+2/2*4-2*3/23";

Dictionary<string, List<int>> results = GetSymbolMatches(input, "+", "-", "*", "/");

foreach(int index in results["+"])
{
    //do something with index
}
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1  
well there is error in your first method on line index = result.IndexOf(search, index); –  mega6382 Oct 10 '13 at 11:25
1  
@mega6382: Sorry, fixed it! –  musefan Oct 10 '13 at 11:31
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Simple = best. Without memory allocation.

public static IEnumerable<int> GetIndexOfEvery(string haystack, string needle)
{
  int index;
  int pos = 0;
  string s = haystack;

  while((index = s.IndexOf(needle)) != -1)
  {              
      yield return index + pos;
      pos = pos + index + 1;
      s = haystack.Substring(pos);
  }
}
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string msg = "1+1+1-2+2/2*4-2*3/23";
Dictionary<char, List<int>> list = new Dictionary<char, List<int>>();
for (int i = 0; i < msg.Length; i++)
{
    if (!list.ContainsKey(msg[i]))
    {
        list.Add(msg[i], new List<int>());
        list[msg[i]].Add(i);
    }
    else
        list[msg[i]].Add(i);
}
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1  
this will count all instances, not get a list of indices –  musefan Oct 10 '13 at 11:33
2  
Consider using TryGetValue instead of ContainsKey followed by list[...] indexer access (you search for the key again which you just found). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Oct 10 '13 at 11:47
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you can try this with changing 'value'

var duplicates = param1.ToCharArray().Select((item, index) => new { item, index })
            .Where(x =>x.item==VALUE).GroupBy(g=>g.index)
             .Select(g => new { Key = g.Key  })
            .ToList();
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1  
Good and close to what I wrote, but you were earlier! Remarks: ToCharArray() is not needed since a System.String is already IEnumerable<char> in itself, so no need to copy the data to an array there. What does 'CONDITION' stand for? Did you really mean to group by g.index? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Oct 10 '13 at 11:43
    
i wrote wrong (and with upper character..shame :/ ) you should write value instead of condition. Like '+' or '5' character –  user2830943 Oct 10 '13 at 12:23
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With Linq:

var allIndices = yourString.Select((c, i) => new { c, i, })
    .Where(a => a.c == '+').Select(a => a.i);

To get a dictionary with all characters in the string, for example:

var allCharsAllIndices = yourString.Select((c, i) => new { c, i, })
    .GroupBy(a => a.c)
    .ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Select(a => a.i).ToArray());
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Brilliant linq, but a standard loop would be faster, if thats what the user is looking for. –  Nicolas Tyler Oct 10 '13 at 12:37
    
@NicolasTyler Thanks, but how do you know what the user wants? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Oct 10 '13 at 19:56
    
ask the OP, i guess. –  Nicolas Tyler Oct 10 '13 at 20:12
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