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I try to learn WCF, so I play with an simple WCF application, From Source Stephen Cleary => async-wcf-today-and-tomorrow

Here is the code fragments:

Simple Contracts:

[DataContract]
public class CalculatorFault
{
  [DataMember]
  public string Message { get; set; }
}

[ServiceContract]
public interface ICalculator
{

  [OperationContract]
  [FaultContract(typeof(CalculatorFault))]
  Task<uint> DivideAsync(uint numerator, uint denominator);
}

Simple Service Implementation:

public class Calculator : ICalculator
{
  public async Task<uint> DivideAsync(uint numerator, uint denominator)
  {
    try
    {
      var myTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => numerator / denominator);
      var result = await myTask;
      return result;
    }
    catch (DivideByZeroException)
    {
      throw new FaultException<CalculatorFault>(new CalculatorFault { Message = "Undefined result" });
    }
  }
}

And Simple Call From Client:

static class Program
{
  static async Task CallCalculator()
  {
    try
    {
      var proxy = new CalculatorClient();
      var task = proxy.DivideAsync(10, 0);
      var result = await task;
      Console.WriteLine("Result: " + result);
    }
    catch (FaultException<CalculatorFault> ex)
    {
      Console.Error.WriteLine("Error: " + ex.Detail.Message);
    }
  }

  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    try
    {
      CallCalculator().Wait();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
      Console.Error.WriteLine(ex);
    }

    Console.ReadKey();
  }
}

And it works: When I try to divide a number with zero, I got the exception from client.

But What I want to do is delegate WCF Call to other functions like old callback functions.So I try the following at client side

async Task CallCalculator()
{
    try
    {
         var task = channel.DivideAsync(10, 0);
         task.ContinueWith(OnWorkCompleted); 
    }
   catch (FaultException<CalculatorFault> ex)
    {
        Console.Error.WriteLine("Error: " + ex.Detail.Message);
    }

}

void OnWorkCompleted(Task<uint> task)
{      
     var result = task.Result;
    Console.WriteLine("Result From Async: " + result);
}

And this also works, but when I try to attempt divide by zero, I got no exception, no result from client although service throw Exception.

Why this may happen? How can I fix it to catch exception from client side?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As a general rule, do not use ContinueWith in async code; you should use await instead.

Your code was actually getting an exception when you called task.Result, but this exception cannot be caught by the catch block in CallCalculator.

So, I would do something like this:

async Task CallCalculator()
{
  try
  {
     var result = await channel.DivideAsync(10, 0);
     OnWorkCompleted(result); 
  }
 catch (FaultException<CalculatorFault> ex)
  {
    Console.Error.WriteLine("Error: " + ex.Detail.Message);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what can .net 4 users do if they cannot use await? –  Ovidiu Buligan Oct 10 at 7:57
    
@OvidiuBuligan: I recommend Microsoft.Bcl.Async for all .NET 4.0 scenarios except ASP.NET. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 10 at 11:37
    
Sorry for asking another slightly related question.. If you want to create a proxy for a project with target framework set to .net 4 the "Generate task based async" is grayed out. I tricked it by generating the task based async on .net 4.5 and switching back to 4.0 with some bat script to remove a line from a generated xml. And it works as far as I can see . Do you know why they grayed out that option when project target runtime is 4.0 ? (I am using vs 2013 express for desktop) –  Ovidiu Buligan Oct 10 at 16:04
    
.NET 4.0 doesn't have async support built-in (it requires the package). You could do it the way you describe or wrap the APM methods from the .NET 4.0-based proxy‌​. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 10 at 16:08

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