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I have a class for rooms. I want that every time I create an object using that class the object would be added to a list of all rooms. Rooms class:

class Rooms:
    """Room class, takes type,days,  occupied or not and when it frees up"""
    def __init__(self, room_type, days, occupied, when_free):
        self.room_type = room_type
        self.days = days
        self.occupied = occupied
        self.when_free = arrow.get(when_free,'YYYY-MM-DD')

Any other feedback is appreciated as well!

also not sure if I should create new topic on this but is it possible that when the object is created and True on occupied is passed to the object you wouldn't need to pass 4th variable and it would take it as the current date instead? in short if there is no 4th variable it passes arrow.get(str(arrow.utcnow()),'YYYY-MM-DD') instead

figured out my second issue. I did change the init to:

def __init__(self, room_type, days, occupied, when_free=str(arrow.get(str(arrow.utcnow()),'YYYY-MM-DD'))):
        self.room_type = room_type
        self.days = days
        self.occupied = occupied
        self.when_free = arrow.get(when_free,'YYYY-MM-DD')
share|improve this question
    
What is your first question? –  justhalf Oct 10 '13 at 12:04
    
What is arrow? Where is "list of rooms"? –  alexvassel Oct 10 '13 at 12:04
    
arrow is a time library (see crsmithdev.com/arrow) and I don't really have list_of_rooms anywhere yet, I would assume I should run it as a global variable somewhere? –  Granitas Oct 10 '13 at 12:07
    
How about adding the Room to a list when you create a Room? I don't think a Room should be adding itself to a global variable. –  Simeon Visser Oct 10 '13 at 12:08
    
yes, currently I just add a room to a list just after I create an object in another line below it, but I thought maybe there would be a more efficient way of doing it. –  Granitas Oct 10 '13 at 12:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ideally, you would want the scope of your room list to be where you plan to use it. Not as part of a room itself. So, if you have a building with rooms:

class Building():
    def __init__(self):
        self.rooms = []

b = Building()
b.rooms.append(Room(room_type, days, occupied, when_free))

The building is just for an example. The important part is rooms.append(). That should be declared and used wherever you actually need to use the list of rooms.

share|improve this answer
    
ah, this makes a lot of sense now. Thank you –  Granitas Oct 10 '13 at 12:57

I would suggest a slightly more elegant and logical way than the above:

class Building(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.rooms = []

class Room(object):
    def __init__(self, building=None)

        if building:
            building.rooms.append(self)
        self.building = building

b = Building()
r = Room(b)

That way, you don't need every time call b.rooms.append and now it more agreese with OOP.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, that is exactly what I was asking for, however it seems that the method posted above is just as good enough, but thank you nevertheless for teaching me this! –  Granitas Oct 10 '13 at 15:12

Might be better just to make the list a class variable:

class Room(object):
    rooms = []
    def __init__(self, room_type, days, occupied, when_free):
        self.room_type = room_type
        self.days = days
        self.occupied = occupied
        self.when_free = arrow.get(when_free,'YYYY-MM-DD')
        Room.rooms.append(self)

r = Room('x', 1,2, True)
Room.rooms
[<Room object at 0x00000000C6325550>]
r.rooms
[<Room object at 0x00000000C6325550>]

Since it's a class variable, you can get to it through any class instance, or the class type itself.

edited to go through 'Room' instead of 'self', which is safer...

share|improve this answer
    
note that ideally, you also need to add something to remove a room from the list when it gets destroyed. –  Corley Brigman Oct 10 '13 at 12:31
    
a class variable retains the same values in every object then? –  Granitas Oct 10 '13 at 12:34
    
@Granitas, no, only if the object itself does not declare that name. Don't do this. Explicitly use Room.rooms.append(self). –  KillianDS Oct 10 '13 at 12:40
    
this is true... so, the above does work. when it gets a name, it will go through the instance variables first, then the class variables. Room.rooms will always point to that list; someone could subclass Room and create their own rooms variable though, and self.rooms would point to that one, while Room.rooms would still point to the class var. –  Corley Brigman Oct 10 '13 at 18:13

I was thinking you could decorate the __init__ method with a decorator that appends the instance to a list, to avoid cluttering the __init__ method with the instance registering. Now you only have to add one decorator to each class' init method if you want to keep track of the instances. Something like:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import sys

class InstanceRegister:
    def __call__(self, init):
        def register(instance, *args, **kwargs):
            init(instance, *args, **kwargs)
            try :
                instance.__class__.__instances__
            except:
                instance.__class__.__instances__ = []
            instance.__class__.__instances__.append(instance)
        return register

class Room:
    """Room class, takes type,days,  occupied or not and when it frees up"""
    @InstanceRegister()
    def __init__(self, room_type, days, occupied, when_free):
        self.room_type = room_type
        self.days = days
        self.occupied = occupied
        self.when_free = arrow.get(when_free,'YYYY-MM-DD')

    def __str__(self):
        return "Room of type {:s}".format(self.room_type)



def main():
    r1 = Room('type_a', 1, True, '1999-12-30')
    r2 = Room('type_b', 2, True, '2000-12-30')
    r3 = Room('type_c', 3, True, '2001-01-30')
    for room in Room.__instances__:
        print("{:s}".format(room))
    return 0

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.exit(main())

More on decorators at Understanding Python Decorators in 12 Easy Steps!

share|improve this answer
    
This is a bit out of my league as of yet. –  Granitas Oct 10 '13 at 12:36
    
@KillianDS that's true the first time you want to do this, and maybe the second time too, but by the third time you would not want to write the same code once more! –  Erik Westrup Oct 10 '13 at 12:50
    
@KillianDS So you prefer to write 200000 lines rather than the much smaller amount of 100010 lines? I find that strange. –  Erik Westrup Oct 10 '13 at 12:58

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