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I'm trying to move a form smoothly using code given on question http://stackoverflow.com/questions/967968/how-to-smoothly-animate-windows-forms-location-with-different-speeds

But for some reason my this.Invalidate() call will never fire up the OnPaint event. Is there some configuration that's required on the form for this to be possible?

Edit:

Threading is involved, as it runs in a backgroundworker with it's own messageloop. Here's the code :

public class PopupWorker
{
    public event PopupRelocateEventHandler RelocateEvent;

    private BackgroundWorker worker;
    private MyPopup popupForm;

    public PopupWorker()
    {
    	worker = new BackgroundWorker();
    	worker.DoWork += worker_DoWork;
    }

    void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
    	popupForm = PopupCreator.CreatePopup("Title", "BodyText");
    	this.RelocateEvent += popupForm.OnRelocate;
    	popupForm.CustomShow();
    	Application.Run();
    }

    public void Show()
    {
    	worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    public void PopupRelocate(object sender, Point newLocation)
    {
    	if (popupForm.InvokeRequired)
    		popupForm.Invoke(new PopupRelocateEventHandler(PopupRelocate), new object[] {sender, newLocation});
    	else
    		RelocateEvent(this, newLocation);
    }
}

Form :

public void OnRelocate(object sender, Point newLocation)
{
    targetLocation = newLocation;
    this.Invalidate();
}

protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnPaint(e);
    if (Location.Y != targetLocation.Y)
    {
        Location = new Point(Location.X, Location.Y + 10);
        if (Location.Y > targetLocation.Y)
            Location = targetLocation;
        this.Invalidate();
    }
}
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can we see some of your code please? –  Stan R. Dec 18 '09 at 17:44
    
are you calling it within a thread? –  user195488 Dec 18 '09 at 17:47
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1 Answer 1

The code in the linked question uses Application.DoEvents, that is the key part for letting OnPaint happen.
Without that, you could use Form.Refresh() instead of Invalidate.

For more details, see this question.

Edit:

Your code does show some problems, but it is not complete. Let's start with the basics, in order to make a Form move all you need is to enable a Timer and this:

private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{            
    this.Location = new Point(this.Location.X + 2, this.Location.Y + 1);
}
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1  
Refresh is usually a bad idea as it forces a paint. This means his UI animations could peg the CPU. –  Frank Krueger Dec 18 '09 at 17:59
1  
@Frank: The only difference is forcing vs request. Both repaint. –  user195488 Dec 18 '09 at 18:09
    
Frank, the OP wants to Move and RePaint. That taxes the CPU, not the method how. –  Henk Holterman Dec 18 '09 at 18:14
    
I Tried all of the methods, and none worked. –  Morri Dec 18 '09 at 18:19
    
Timer was my first strategy, and it did work. But the movement wasn't very smooth and I didn't want to create a timer that would tick every 1 milliseconds. –  Morri Dec 19 '09 at 5:48
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