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I have an int and I want to obtain a char* containing that int. My code is:

int getLength(int x) {
    int l = 0;
    while(x) {
        l++;
        x /= 10;
    }
    return l;
}

char* toString(int x) {
    int l = getLength(x);
    char *str = new char[l];
    l--; // the digits will be placed on positions 0 to l-1
    while(l >= 0) {
        str[l] = x % 10 + '0';
        x /= 10;
        l--;
    }
    return str;
}

Some of the results:

toString(1009) = 1009Ä
toString(23) = 23L

Why? I allocated space only for l characters. (l = length of int)

share|improve this question
1  
There is a function in stdlib - itoa(), which does this. Also, your string buffer us not null-terminated. – OldProgrammer Oct 10 '13 at 13:40
    
@OldProgrammer itoa is not a standard function though. – Kninnug Oct 10 '13 at 13:41
    
Is this a C or C++ question? In C, there's no new, but in C++ you wouldn't use new char[] - you'd use a plain std::string or std::vector<char>. – Frerich Raabe Oct 10 '13 at 13:55
    
Try using snprintf. – Thomas Matthews Oct 10 '13 at 14:01
    
Re: "I want to obtain a char* containing that int" - a char* is a pointer; it cannot contain an int. What you want is a char array containing a text representation of the value of that int. – Pete Becker Oct 10 '13 at 14:42

You need to null terminate your string. C strings are a series of characters followed by a '\0', or null character; that's how the various string handling functions know when the string ends. Without the null, the C standard string handling functions will just keep on reading past the end of the string to whatever values happen to lie beyond it.

Remember to allocate one extra character so you have room for the null, and store a '\0' at the end:

char *str = new char[l+1];
str[l] = '\0';

By the way, new is a C++ operator. In C, you would use malloc(). In C++, it's probably better to use std::string, as it handles allocating memory and doesn't need null termination.

share|improve this answer
1  
The code wont work for negative number, by the way... – hivert Oct 10 '13 at 13:41
    
+1 but, "store the null, and store a '\0' at the end", these are the same thing, are they not? :) – Moo-Juice Oct 10 '13 at 14:09
    
@Moo-Juice Sorry, in the first clause I meant "allocate one extra character in which to store the null", while in the second I mentioned actually storing it. The way I phrased it is a bit unclear; I'll rewrite it. – Brian Campbell Oct 10 '13 at 14:22

Put a null character at the end of the char[]. The artifcates you are seeing at the end of the char[] are garbage value.

char* toString(int x) {
    int l = getLength(x);
    char *str = new char[l+1]; //+1 for null character

    str[l]='\0'; // putting null character at the end of char[]

    l--; 
    while(l >= 0) {
        str[l] = x % 10 + '0';
        x /= 10;
        l--;
    }
    return str;
}
share|improve this answer

This doesn't answer your question (why you get that funny output, which is due to a missing null-terminator as the other answers correctly point out) directly, but since your question is tagged C++: in C++, you wouldn't even need to write the function yourself, you might be just fine with std::ostringstream:

#include <sstream>
#include <string>

std::string toString(int x)
{
    std::ostringstream stream;
    stream << x;
    return stream.str();
}
share|improve this answer

You can get the length of the int using log10, then you need to put a null in the end of the char array

int getLength(int x) {
        return ceil(log10(x));
    }
    char* toString(int x) {
        int l = getLength(x);
        char *str = new char[l+1]; //+1 for null character
        str[l]='\0'; // putting null character at the end of char[]

        while(l >= 0) {
            str[--l] = x % 10 + '0'; // put the last digit in l - 1
            x /= 10;
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If x < 0, log10(x) will not work. OTOH, OP does not work well for such x either. – chux Oct 10 '13 at 14:21

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