Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a few before filters which I am using to control access to resources on a resource-by-resource level. The basic idea is as follows:

  1. A user can be a user or admin and can have access to specific resources based on an "accesses" table.
  2. Resources/methods can be limited in access to admin, owner, particular users, or everyone.

This is best illustrated by some code examples. We have 4 application-level methods that are added to the call chain with before_filter. Here is the top of an example controller class:

before_filter :require_user
before_filter :get_object, :only=>[:show, :edit, :update, :destroy]
before_filter :require_access, :only=>[:show]
before_filter :require_owner, :only=>[:edit, :update, :destroy]

As you can see, first we require that a user be logged in to access any method in this controller. Here are 3 fo the methods (defined in application.rb) so that you can see what they look like:

 private
 def get_object
   begin
     class_name = controller_name.gsub("Controller","").downcase.singularize
     instance_variable_set "@#{class_name}".to_sym, class_name.capitalize.constantize.find(params[:id])
   rescue
     flash[:error] = "You do not have access to that #{class_name}."
     redirect_to "/" and return
   end
 end

 private
 def require_owner
   class_name = controller_name.gsub("Controller","").downcase.singularize
   accessable = instance_variable_get("@#{class_name.downcase}")
   unless accessable.user == current_user
     flash[:error] = "You do not have access to that #{class_name.downcase}."
     redirect_to "/" and return
   end
 end

 private
 def require_access
   class_name = controller_name.gsub("Controller","").downcase.singularize
   accessable = self.instance_variable_get("@#{class_name.downcase}")
   unless current_user.has_access?(accessable)
     flash[:error] = "You do not have access to that #{class_name.downcase}."
     redirect_to "/" and return
   end
 end

This is all fine, as far as I can tell, from a coding perspective. But it's just so god-damn ugly! In particular the lines:

 class_name = controller_name.gsub("Controller","").downcase.singularize
 obj = instance_variable_get("@#{class_name.downcase}")

OR

 instance_variable_set "@#{class_name}".to_sym, class_name.capitalize.constantize.find(params[:id])

Does anyone know of a bit more elegant way to do what I am doing here?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't know if there's a really clean way to do this, but here are a few suggestions:

First, create a controller ResourceController and have all relevant controllers inherit from it. (If this authorization applies to all controllers you can just use ApplicationController.)

Now, implement a private method in the superclass called model_name (like your class_name) so you don't have to derive it every time you need it. And, you should be able to derive it by simply doing this:

def model_name
  controller_name.classify
end

You can also implement a model method in the superclass which returns the actual class:

def model
  model_name.constantize
end

At this point you might as well also add something like this:

def current_object
  model.find(params[:id])
end

def current_object_var_name
  "@#{model_name.underscore}"
end

I don't see a quick way around using instance_variable_get/set except for always using @object or something like it. But if you don't want to do that, those lines are now a little simpler:

instance_variable_set current_object_var_name, current_object
obj = instance_variable_get(current_object_var_name)

At this point your code should be more readable, and a little prettier.

You might also want to look into what some of the recent Rails authorization plugins are doing, in particular cancan and declarative_authorization.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, great, these do work quite nicely. Only, it should be controller_name.gsub("Controller","").classify right? –  Ron Gejman Dec 18 '09 at 18:50
    
Hmm...in my controllers, the controller_name method gets rid of the word "controller" for you. In other words, if the controller is FastCarsController then controller_name returns the string "fast_cars". Try putting this in a view: <%= controller.controller_name %> to see exactly what it returns for you. –  Alex Reisner Dec 18 '09 at 19:46
    
Oh, I see. In the past I've used params[:controller] and I didn't realize that controller_name was not yielding the same thing. –  Ron Gejman Dec 18 '09 at 20:12
add comment

Well, you can do the 2 following things:

1- First remove the 2 other private statements, the first one is enough. Remember private, protected and public are just other methods defined in Ruby Module class.

2- It's better to refactor the code to set that object creation in its method:

def create_object
  class_name = controller_name.gsub("Controller","").downcase.singularize
  obj = instance_variable_get("@#{class_name.downcase}")
end

def locate_object
 instance_variable_set "@#{class_name}".to_sym class_name.capitalize.constantize.find(params[:id])
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

Combining both of your answers I am left with the following fairly clean code, which I really should put into a separate plugin.

 private
 def get_resource
   begin
     instance_variable_set current_object_var_name.to_sym, model_name.constantize.find(params[:id])
   rescue
     flash[:error] = "You do not have access to that #{model_name}."
     redirect_to "/" and return
   end
 end

 def require_owner
   unless resource.user == current_user
     flash[:error] = "You do not have access to that  #{model_name}."
     redirect_to "/" and return
   end
 end

 def require_access
   unless current_user.has_access?(resource)
     flash[:error] = "You do not have access to that #{model_name}."
     redirect_to "/" and return
   end
 end

 def resource
   instance_variable_get(current_object_var_name)
 end

 def model_name
   @model_name ||= controller_name.classify
 end

 def current_object_var_name
   "@#{model_name.underscore}"
 end
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.