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I'm wondering which would be the proper way to deal with events which depend on the status of a variable.

Right now, I have a listener which it is only added if the option isTablet is set to true. (as if not, it breaks in old versions of IE). So it looks like this:

if(options.isTablet){
    document.addEventListener('touchmove', function(e){
      ....
    });
}

Now, I'm having troubles if I want to change the variable isTablet dynamically with a setter and It won't load the event touchmove.

$.fn.myPlugin.setIsTablet = function(value){
    options.isTablet = value;
}

I guess the simple way is always adding the event and inside it deciding whether or not to execute the code:

document.addEventListener('touchmove', function(e){
    if(options.isTablet){
        ....
    }
});

But throws an error in IE 8:

Object doesn't support property or method 'addEventListener'

What would be the way of doing it? Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
You're probably right to always add the listener and check the condition inside. To avoid the error, since you're already using jQuery, just use jQuery: $(document).on('touchmove', function(e) { ... }); –  Jason P Oct 10 '13 at 14:32
    
In other cases, for example .scroll() does it make sense to be checking a variable on every scroll? Isn't there any other way then? Thanks! –  Alvaro Oct 10 '13 at 14:34
1  
An alternative would be to use on() and off() to add and remove the handlers in your setIsTablet function –  Jason P Oct 10 '13 at 14:36
    
Which one do you think it would be better? –  Alvaro Oct 10 '13 at 14:39
    
I guess it depends on how often the handler is called, and how long it takes the handler to run. For something like the scroll event, which is called very often, it might be better to remove the handler. For a click event, it's probably ok to check the condition. –  Jason P Oct 10 '13 at 14:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Generally, I would always add the listener and check the condition inside. To avoid your error, since you're using jQuery, just use jQuery:

$(document).on('touchmove', function(e){
    if(options.isTablet){
        ....
    }
});

If you have a handler that is called very often, you could consider turning it off when not needed. Something like this:

function myHandler(e) { ... }

$.fn.myPlugin.setIsTablet = function(value){
    options.isTablet = value;
    if (value) {
        $(document).off('touchmove').on('touchmove', myHandler);
    } else {
        $(document).off('touchmove');
    }
}

Be careful not to bind the handler more than once (like if true is sent to setIsTablet more than once in a row). You could also use a flag instead of unbinding/binding like I've shown.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean, using the off before the on, right? That's how you are doing it in the example. That way you will bind it only once right? –  Alvaro Oct 10 '13 at 15:46
    
Yes, that should handle it. A flag might be more performant though. –  Jason P Oct 10 '13 at 15:48
    
Ok, thanks for it! –  Alvaro Oct 10 '13 at 16:05

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