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I have a Unix command that outputs file contents with each line prefixed by the respective file name:

C:\lessgov.txt | WHY LESS GOVERNMENT IS BETTER GOVERNMENT
C:\lessgov.txt | A rant...

C:\todos.txt | TODOS
C:\todos.txt | buy bread
C:\todos.txt | shine shoes

What precise command can I use to remove everything after and including the vertical bar? (I am thinking sed but I've no real idea how to use it if I'm right.)

C:\lessgov.txt
C:\lessgov.txt

C:\todos.txt
C:\todos.txt
C:\todos.txt

I am actually using Windows but I have a port of most of the Unix commands at my disposal.

EDIT:

This worked.

cmd> search $dirs | tail -n5 | concat --prefix | grep CPCMS | sed "s/|.*//"

search and concat are custom.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a few choices here, here's a sed solution if you need to strip the space before the |

 sed 's/ *|.*//' file.txt

to retain the space before the |

 sed 's/|.*//' file.txt
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Thanks. I got it to work. :) –  Mario Oct 10 '13 at 15:25

many unix tools can do that job,

Assume you don't have spaces in your file/dir names: e.g grep:

grep -o '^\S\+' file

awk:

awk '{print $1}' file

or

awk '$0=$1' file

sed, cut .... can do it too.

If you have spaces in your path, it is not hard either to be handled, just playing with the FS/Separator expression.

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The most verbose and easy-to-remember command I can think of is cut:

 cut -- cut out selected portions of each line of a file
 [...]
 -d delim
         Use delim as the field delimiter character instead of the tab
         character.

 -f list
         The list specifies fields, separated in the input by the field
         delimiter character (see the -d option.)  Output fields are sepa-
         rated by a single occurrence of the field delimiter character.
 [...]
 -s      Suppress lines with no field delimiter characters.  Unless speci-
         fied, lines with no delimiters are passed through unmodified.

-fN says "select the Nth field", while -dC says "splitting by character C".

In your case, cat the_file | cut -f1 -d'|':

$ cat the_file 
C:\lessgov.txt | WHY LESS GOVERNMENT IS BETTER GOVERNMENT
C:\lessgov.txt | A rant...

C:\todos.txt | TODOS
C:\todos.txt | buy bread
C:\todos.txt | shine shoes
$ cat the_file | cut -f1 -d'|'
C:\lessgov.txt 
C:\lessgov.txt 

C:\todos.txt 
C:\todos.txt 
C:\todos.txt 

If you want to leave that blank line out, add -s switch and you're done.

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