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I have a continuation chain of Tasks that may be cancelled, say, after a timeout occurs. I want to identify which task was running when the cancellation happened. Here's what I'm talking about:

CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();

Task timeoutTask = Task.Delay(5000).ContinueWith((t) => cts.Cancel());

Task workChain = Task.Factory.StartNew((t) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("Running task " + Task.CurrentId);
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
}, -1, cts.Token);

Task parent = workChain;
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    parent = parent.ContinueWith((t, o) =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Running task " + Task.CurrentId);
            Console.WriteLine("Last Task.AsyncState = " + t.AsyncState);
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }, i, cts.Token, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion, TaskScheduler.Current);
}
parent.ContinueWith((t) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("Cancel task " + Task.CurrentId);
    Console.WriteLine("Last running Task.AsyncState = " + t.AsyncState);
}, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCanceled);

When I run the above, the antecedent passed into the OnlyOnCanceled one isn't the task that was running when things were cancelled. I know why: the OnlyOnCanceled task is parented by the last task created in the loop, and when the timeout occurs, all tasks that aren't completed are marked as canceled without being started.

Having each task check the state of the token and store something elsewhere works most of the time, but there's a small chance that the cancellation happens after one task completes before the next task begins. In that case, I don't find out anything about the first canceled task. I could always store something when a task starts and something else if it is canceled, but this starts to feel kludgy pretty quickly.

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1  
So, you say you want to know which task was running when cancellation happened, but as you said, it could be none. Cancellation can happen after one ends and before the next starts. Do you want to know the last task to be completed successfully, or the first task that didn't complete successfully? – Servy Oct 10 '13 at 15:37
2  
Side note, if you want the CTS to cancel the task in 5000 ms just put 5000 in the CTS constructor; much simpler than what you're doing. – Servy Oct 10 '13 at 15:44
    
Why are you using ContinueWith() instead of await? And why are you using a chain of Tasks instead of a single Task with a loop in it? – svick Oct 10 '13 at 16:22
    
I want to know the first task that didn't complete before the timeout. That should be the earlier (in the chain) of: the task that is running when the token is canceled or the first task that isn't started because the token is canceled prior to task start. – Mike Van Vertloo Oct 10 '13 at 16:44
    
I can't create a single Task with a loop in it because (unlike the simplified example above), all the work may not be defined in one place. And I really don't want to have a list of Actions or Funcs around, then make a single task to execute everything in that list. – Mike Van Vertloo Oct 10 '13 at 16:48

Make each task that might be running record that it started or stopped executing. The TPL does not record which tasks were running when.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

What I found works for me, but still doesn't feel as clean as it should:

  • Each task in the main chain doesn't take the CancellationToken, but gets a second continuation (not part of the main chain) that runs OnlyOnFaulted.
  • Each of those tasks does its work in a child task, then waits on the child task with by calling .Wait(CancellationToken). When the token is canceled, the Wait call throws an exception, which faults the task that was running. This allows reporting of the error without waiting on the child task to complete.
  • Every task in the main chain runs OnlyOnRanToCompletion.
  • One task at the end of the main chain that runs OnlyOnRanToCompletion reports success of the entire chain (i.e. no timeout).

When the token is canceled, the currently-running task stops waiting for its child task with an OperationCanceledException. The side branch for that task handles the exception (or any other exception) by special-casing the presence of OperationCanceledException in the antecedent's AggregateException.InnerExceptions. Since the task in the main chain faulted, no other task in the main chain will run.

CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource(25000);

Task workChain = Task.Factory.StartNew((o) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("Running task {0} with state {1}", Task.CurrentId, o);
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
}, -1);

Task parent = workChain;
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    parent = parent.ContinueWith((ante, o) =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Running task {0} with state {1}", Task.CurrentId, o);
            Task subTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                Thread.Sleep(10000);
                Console.WriteLine("Subtask completed");
            });
            subTask.Wait(cts.Token);
        }, i, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
    parent.ContinueWith((ante) =>
        {
            foreach (Exception e in ante.Exception.InnerExceptions)
            {
                if (e is OperationCanceledException)
                {
                    //report timeout
                    Console.WriteLine("Timed out while running task id {0}", ante.Id);
                    return;
                }
            }
            //report other exception
            Console.WriteLine("Something bad happened: {0}", ante.Exception.GetBaseException());
        }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
}
Task lastTask = parent.ContinueWith((ante) =>
    {
        //report success
        Console.WriteLine("Success");
    }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
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