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I'm having trouble reading in a file that contains an unusual character, in this case an arrow symbol: enter image description here. Have tried specifying input file formats, eg:

> scan('SMKA121212' , what="", sep="\n", blank.lines.skip=T, fileEncoding="UTF-8")
Read 13 items
Warning message:
In scan(file, what, nmax, sep, dec, quote, skip, nlines, na.strings,  :
  invalid input found on input connection 'SMKA121212'

> scan('SMKA121212', what="", sep="\n", blank.lines.skip=FALSE, encoding="UTF-8")
Read 1724 items

(there are actually over 10k rows and the read is breaking on the arrow character)

I'm a little unclear about the difference between encoding and fileEncoding in terms of how R responds to characters it does not expect. Clarification might be useful.

Grateful for any advice on how to force R to read in full documents and perhaps just ignore characters that don't conform to a system.

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With graphics and encoding problems it is often helpful to state your OS and R version numbers. –  BondedDust Oct 10 '13 at 17:42
    
Use a text editor and post lines 1720-1730. Also post lines 1:20. The encoding parameter results in a "labeling" of the character vectors. The fileiEncoding gives directions about what encoding to use. –  BondedDust Oct 10 '13 at 19:41
    
Thanks. The lines are much too long to post so I've zipped them to dropbox. The're a bit unusual: for some formatting reason Sublime can't open these files (which are UK government stats) but EditPad and Notepad etc can no problem. This may be related to the problem. –  geotheory Oct 11 '13 at 10:14
    
What you should have done was post the link to that webpage from the very start!. It becomes clear on reading uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Documents/Tech_Spec_SMKA12.DOC that these records are intended to be fixed width format files and the format is described therein detailing that there is a header line and a trailing line and then data lines in between –  BondedDust Oct 14 '13 at 16:10
    
Perhaps, but my question is more generally related to character handling than specifically reading in these files. Its possible to approach these files with either fixed-width or delimited methods. –  geotheory Oct 14 '13 at 16:31
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I'm seeing in my text editor is the use of "|" as a separator rather than "\n" and in line 1724 this sequence:

kibbled [ìGrtzeî or ìgruttenî], pearl...     

There are two different accented characters that appear to be enclosing Grtze and grutten but the character you see was not displayed.

When I read it in on a Mac with:

read.table("~/Downloads/lines/1720-1730.txt", sep="|")

The characters in question appear thusly:

[\x93Gr\032tze\x94 or \x93grutten\x94]

So the 'arrow' you are seeing is \032. I have found that it is rather difficult to decipher what is meant by the various 'escaped' R output. The best place to look is the ?Quotes page and there we learn that this is 32 octal or 26 decimal. You might want to try this as you input strategy and see how it goes:

x <- read.table("yourpath/filename.txt", sep="|", stringsAsFactors=FALSE, allowEscapes = TRUE)

If that is insufficient then try adding one of the encoding options "latin1", "UTF-8", "UTF-16" and if unsuccessful there are other Windows encodings yet to try.

When you get a message about a a lower number of elements it ususually means there is an unmatched quote or an embedded hash ("#"). You can add these parameters: quote="", comment.char="". If you want to see the effect of those additional comments you can use this:

 table(count.fields("yourpath/filename.txt", sep="|", stringsAsFactors=FALSE, 
         allowEscapes = TRUE, quote="", comment.char=""))

There are further inspection maneuvers that let you see which lines are problems:

 which(count.fields("yourpath/filename.txt", sep="|", stringsAsFactors=FALSE, 
         allowEscapes = TRUE, quote="", comment.char="") == 28)

There can be a mismatch between your locale and the default codings. You should report the results of sessionInfo()

Encodings I have see mentioned as solving weird problems include "CP1252", "Latin2" (which is ISO-8859-2), but I have discovered that the list of encodings is larger than I expected:

 iconvlist()  # 419 encodings

If you know the organization that created the file then why not ask them?

From the first of the multiple zip files included in that "master" zip file, we see this resutl to my suggestion to use count.fields:

table( count.fields("~/Downloads/SMKA12_2012archive/SMKA121212", quote="", 
      sep="|",comment.char="") )
#------------
   15    27    28 
    1 10228     1 
which( count.fields("~/Downloads/SMKA12_2012archive/SMKA121212", quote="", sep="|",comment.char="") ==15)
#[1] 1
which( count.fields("~/Downloads/SMKA12_2012archive/SMKA121212", quote="", sep="|",comment.char="") ==28)
#[1] 10230

Reading these files on a Mac with R 3.0.1 and TextEdit.app. The first record appears to be not really a header but rather a notation, perhaps signifying the month of data recording:

000000000|||||||||||||||||||||||||||HMCUSTOMS CONTROL DATA|2012|12

The last record has a non-data trailing record that includes a final record count appended to it. 999999999| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |0010228

So using skip= 1 and fill =TRUE should allow error free input.

dat <- read.table("~/Downloads/SMKA12_2012archive/SMKA121212", quote="", sep="|",comment.char="", fill=TRUE, skip=1 , colClasses=c( rep("integer", 2), rep("character", 4), rep("integer", 24-7+1), rep("character", 3)))
> str(dat)
'data.frame':   10230 obs. of  27 variables:
 $ V1 : int  10110100 10110900 10121000 10129100 10129900 10130000 10190000 10190110 10190190 10190300 ...
 $ V2 : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V3 : chr  "00/00" "00/00" "01/12" "01/12" ...
 $ V4 : chr  "12/11" "12/11" "00/00" "00/00" ...
 $ V5 : chr  "00/00" "00/00" "01/12" "01/12" ...
 $ V6 : chr  "12/11" "12/11" "00/00" "00/00" ...
 $ V7 : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V8 : int  150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 ...
 $ V9 : int  2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ...
 $ V10: int  13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 ...
 $ V11: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V12: int  200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 ...
 $ V13: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V14: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V15: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V16: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V17: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V18: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V19: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V20: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V21: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V22: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V23: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V24: int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ V25: chr  "KG " "KG " "KG " "KG " ...
 $ V26: chr  "NO " "NO " "NO " "NO " ...
 $ V27: chr  "Pure-bred breeding horses                                                                                                      "| __truncated__ "Pure-bred breeding asses                                                                                                       "| __truncated__ "Pure-bred breeding horses                                                                                                      "| __truncated__ "Horses for slaughter                                                                                                           "| __truncated__ ...

As far as encoding issues I cannot give further insight:

Encoding (readLines("~/Downloads/SMKA12_2012archive/SMKA121212", n=1))
#[1] "unknown"
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I know scan isn't ideal, but read.table was also failing. Your example (& encoding opts) fail with: Error in scan(file, what, nmax, sep, dec, quote, skip, nlines, na.strings, : line 6268 did not have 27 elements. That line is not suspicious to me (line 5). Wondering if the best solution is to find an OSX tool to clean the data and enforce an encoding scheme.. –  geotheory Oct 12 '13 at 11:02
    
See further comments. –  BondedDust Oct 12 '13 at 11:44
    
Your table query reports: 15 27 28 1 10228 1 - which suggests all is ok as I'm skipping the first line and last (using an nrow = nrow(read.csv(file))-1 argument). On encoding I've established with python's chardet that encoding is 87% likely to be 'ISO-8859-2'. –  geotheory Oct 12 '13 at 11:55
    
(encoding="ISO-8859-2" still fails however) –  geotheory Oct 12 '13 at 11:59
    
If it helps reproducibility, the file is the last of this archive, available from uktradeinfo.com (see for background info. –  geotheory Oct 12 '13 at 12:05
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