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I am having issues with committing a transaction within my @Transactional method:

methodA() {
    methodB()
}

@Transactional
methodB() {
    ...
    em.persist();
    ...
    em.flush();
    log("OK");
}

When I call methodB() from methodA(), the method passes successfuly and I can see "OK" in my logs. But then I get

Could not commit JPA transaction; nested exception is javax.persistence.RollbackException: Transaction marked as rollbackOnly org.springframework.transaction.TransactionSystemException: Could not commit JPA transaction; nested exception is javax.persistence.RollbackException: Transaction marked as rollbackOnly
    at org.springframework.orm.jpa.JpaTransactionManager.doCommit(JpaTransactionManager.java:521)
    at org.springframework.transaction.support.AbstractPlatformTransactionManager.processCommit(AbstractPlatformTransactionManager.java:754)
    at org.springframework.transaction.support.AbstractPlatformTransactionManager.commit(AbstractPlatformTransactionManager.java:723)
    at org.springframework.transaction.interceptor.TransactionAspectSupport.commitTransactionAfterReturning(TransactionAspectSupport.java:393)
    at org.springframework.transaction.interceptor.TransactionInterceptor.invoke(TransactionInterceptor.java:120)
    at org.springframework.aop.framework.ReflectiveMethodInvocation.proceed(ReflectiveMethodInvocation.java:172)
    at org.springframework.aop.framework.Cglib2AopProxy$DynamicAdvisedInterceptor.intercept(Cglib2AopProxy.java:622)
    at methodA()...
  1. The context of methodB is completely missign in the exception - which is okay I suppose?
  2. Something within the methodB() marked the transaction as rollback only? How can I find it out? Is there for instance a way to check something like getCurrentTransaction().isRollbackOnly()? - like this I could step through the method and find the cause.
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3 Answers 3

When you mark your method as @Transactional, occurrence of any exception inside your method will mark the surrounding TX as roll-back only (even if you catch them). You can use other attributes of @Transactional annotation to prevent it of rolling back like:

@Transactional(rollbackFor=MyException.class, noRollbackFor=MyException2.class)
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I tried to use noRollbackFor=Exception.class, but it seems to have no effect – does it work for inherited exceptions? –  Vojtěch Oct 11 '13 at 6:28
2  
Yes it does. Looking at your own answer, that is right (you hadn't provided methodC in your first post). Both methodB and methodC use same TX and always the most specific @Transactional annotation is used, so when methodC throws the exception, surrounding TX will be marked as rollback-only. You can also use different propagation markers to prevent this. –  Ean Oct 13 '13 at 0:07
    
@Ean any exception inside your method will mark the surrounding TX as roll-back only Does this also applies for readOnly transactions? –  lolotron Jun 11 at 11:09
    
@lolotron I have not noticed read-only TXs in particular but they should not be different. Read-only is something which is implemented in dialect level so it shouldn't impact the whole behavior. –  Ean Jun 11 at 11:47
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I finally understood the problem:

methodA() {
    methodB()
}

@Transactional(noRollbackFor = Exception.class)
methodB() {
    ...
    try {
        methodC()
    } catch (...) {...}
    log("OK");
}

@Transactional
methodC() {
    throw new ...();
}

What happens is that even though the methodB has the right annotation, the methodC does not. When the exception is thrown, the second @Transactional marks the first transaction as Rollback only anyway.

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Look for exceptions being thrown and caught in the ... sections of your code. Runtime and rollbacking application exceptions cause rollback when thrown out of a business method even if caught on some other place.

You can use context to find out whether the transaction is marked for rollback.

@Resource
private SessionContext context;

context.getRollbackOnly();
share|improve this answer
    
It seems to me I found the cause, but I don't understand why this is happening. An inner method throws an exception, which I catch, log and ignore. But the Transaction is marked as Rollback only anyway. How can I prevent it? I don't want the Transactions to be influenced by exceptions which I properly catch. –  Vojtěch Oct 10 '13 at 23:10
    
Is SessionContext a standard class in Spring? It seems to me it is rather EJB3 and it is not contained in my Spring Application. –  Vojtěch Oct 11 '13 at 6:43
    
My bad I missed the fact that it is about Spring. Anyway there should be something like TransactionAspectSupport.currentTransactionStatus().isRollbackOnly() available. –  Mareen Oct 11 '13 at 7:22

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