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Where n is the input to the function can be any integer.

i = n, total = 0; 
while (i > 0) {      
 for (j=0; j<i; j++) 
   for (k=0; k<i; k++) 
     total++;      
 i = i/4; 
} 

What is the time complexity of this function?

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it's O(n ^ 2 log n). –  user529758 Oct 10 '13 at 17:34
    
n ^ 2 log <4> n (log base = 4) –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 10 '13 at 17:36
    
@GrijeshChauhan Base of logarithm doesn't matter. –  user529758 Oct 10 '13 at 17:39
1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about theoretical computer science, and it shows no research effort. –  user529758 Oct 10 '13 at 17:40
1  
since when code complexity is off topic? –  UmNyobe Mar 4 '14 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

One way to think about this is to look at the loops independently.

This inner loop nest:

for (j=0; j<i; j++) 
   for (k=0; k<i; k++) 
     total++;

will execute a total of Θ(i2) operations, since each loop independently runs i times.

Now, let's look at the outer loop:

while (i > 0) {      
    /* do Theta(i^2) work */   
    i = i/4; 
} 

This loop will run a total of at most 1 + log4 i times, since on each iteration i is cut by a factor of 1/4, and this can only happen 1 + log4 i times before i drops to zero. The question, then, is how much work will be done.

One way to solve this is to write a simple recurrence relation for the total work done. We can think of the loop as a tail-recursive function, where each iteration does Θ(i2) work and then makes a recursive call on a subproblem of size 4. This gives this recurrence:

T(n) = T(n / 4) + Θ(n2).

Applying the Master Theorem, we see that a = 1, b = 4, and c = 2. Since logb a = log4 1 = 0 and 0 < c, the Master Theorem says (by Case 3) that the runtime solves to Θ(n2). Therefore, the total work done is Θ(n2).

Here's another way to think about this. The first iteration of the loop does n2 work. The next does (n / 4)2 = n2 / 16 work. The next does (n / 64)2 = n2 / 256 work. In fact, iteration x of the loop will do n2 / 16x work. Therefore, the total work done is given by

n2(1 + 1 / 16 + 1 / 162 + 1 / 163 + ...)

≤ n2(1 / (1 - 1/16))

= Θ(n2)

(This uses the formula for the sum of an infinite geometric series).

Hope this helps!

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Nice explanation. How do you get the "Big Theta" to look like a big theta? –  mrip Oct 10 '13 at 20:02
    
@mrip: I'm using the HTML entity &Theta;. It's pretty nifty! –  templatetypedef Oct 10 '13 at 20:02
    
Cool! Thanks! I guess they also have &Omega –  mrip Oct 10 '13 at 20:03

The running time is O(n^2), and the number of times that total is incremented is asymptotic to n^2/(1-1/16) which is about 1.067 n^2. The recurrence is going to be

T(n) = n^2 + T(n/4)
     = n^2 + n^2/16 + T(n/16)
     = n^2 (1 + 1/16 + 1/16^2 + ...)
     = n^2 / (1 - 1/16)
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why no log base 4 anywhere? –  Blaz Art Oct 10 '13 at 18:13
    
Because log base 4 is not part of the equation for the running time. –  mrip Oct 10 '13 at 18:33
1  
@BlazArt- Although the loop runs log_4 n times, the work done on each iteration decreases geometrically. The sum of the geometric series doesn't include the log term. In general, log terms happen if you iterate logarithmically many times and do the same amount of work each time. If the work drops off geometrically, as is the case here, you tend not to see the log terms. –  templatetypedef Oct 10 '13 at 19:59
    
@templatetypedef I just had some confusion but your line "In general, log terms happen if you iterate logarithmically many times and do the same amount of work each time." corrected my confusion Many thanks for your answers. –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 10 '13 at 20:02

This code fragment:

i = n, total = 0; 
while (i > 0) {      
 for (j=0; j<i; j++) 
   for (k=0; k<i; k++) 
     total++;      
 i = i/4; 
}

is equivalent to this one:

for ( i = n ; i > 0 ; i = i / 4 )
    for ( j = 0 ; j < i ; j ++) 
        for ( k = 0 ; k < i ; k ++)
            total ++;

Therefore, methodically (empirically verified), you may obtain the following using Sigma Notation:*

enter image description here

With many thanks to WolframAlpha.

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