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I need to create UID's on my my server side code, as well as on client side code (in the browser). I currently use NewID() as my default value, but when creating objects the client side (in browser), I use uuid.js. Am I more likely to get collisions with NewSequentialId() as my default value (which will be used when objects are created server side)?

FYI here is the uuid.js code, as I can't recall where I downloaded it.

//     uuid.js
//
//     Copyright (c) 2010-2012 Robert Kieffer
//     MIT License - http://opensource.org/licenses/mit-license.php

(function() {
  var _global = this;

  // Unique ID creation requires a high quality random # generator.  We feature
  // detect to determine the best RNG source, normalizing to a function that
  // returns 128-bits of randomness, since that's what's usually required
  var _rng;

  // Node.js crypto-based RNG - http://nodejs.org/docs/v0.6.2/api/crypto.html
  //
  // Moderately fast, high quality
  if (typeof(require) == 'function') {
    try {
      var _rb = require('crypto').randomBytes;
      _rng = _rb && function() {return _rb(16);};
    } catch(e) {}
  }

  if (!_rng && _global.crypto && crypto.getRandomValues) {
    // WHATWG crypto-based RNG - http://wiki.whatwg.org/wiki/Crypto
    //
    // Moderately fast, high quality
    var _rnds8 = new Uint8Array(16);
    _rng = function whatwgRNG() {
      crypto.getRandomValues(_rnds8);
      return _rnds8;
    };
  }

  if (!_rng) {
    // Math.random()-based (RNG)
    //
    // If all else fails, use Math.random().  It's fast, but is of unspecified
    // quality.
    var  _rnds = new Array(16);
    _rng = function() {
      for (var i = 0, r; i < 16; i++) {
        if ((i & 0x03) === 0) r = Math.random() * 0x100000000;
        _rnds[i] = r >>> ((i & 0x03) << 3) & 0xff;
      }

      return _rnds;
    };
  }

  // Buffer class to use
  var BufferClass = typeof(Buffer) == 'function' ? Buffer : Array;

  // Maps for number <-> hex string conversion
  var _byteToHex = [];
  var _hexToByte = {};
  for (var i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
    _byteToHex[i] = (i + 0x100).toString(16).substr(1);
    _hexToByte[_byteToHex[i]] = i;
  }

  // **`parse()` - Parse a UUID into it's component bytes**
  function parse(s, buf, offset) {
    var i = (buf && offset) || 0, ii = 0;

    buf = buf || [];
    s.toLowerCase().replace(/[0-9a-f]{2}/g, function(oct) {
      if (ii < 16) { // Don't overflow!
        buf[i + ii++] = _hexToByte[oct];
      }
    });

    // Zero out remaining bytes if string was short
    while (ii < 16) {
      buf[i + ii++] = 0;
    }

    return buf;
  }

  // **`unparse()` - Convert UUID byte array (ala parse()) into a string**
  function unparse(buf, offset) {
    var i = offset || 0, bth = _byteToHex;
    return  bth[buf[i++]] + bth[buf[i++]] +
            bth[buf[i++]] + bth[buf[i++]] + '-' +
            bth[buf[i++]] + bth[buf[i++]] + '-' +
            bth[buf[i++]] + bth[buf[i++]] + '-' +
            bth[buf[i++]] + bth[buf[i++]] + '-' +
            bth[buf[i++]] + bth[buf[i++]] +
            bth[buf[i++]] + bth[buf[i++]] +
            bth[buf[i++]] + bth[buf[i++]];
  }

  // **`v1()` - Generate time-based UUID**
  //
  // Inspired by https://github.com/LiosK/UUID.js
  // and http://docs.python.org/library/uuid.html

  // random #'s we need to init node and clockseq
  var _seedBytes = _rng();

  // Per 4.5, create and 48-bit node id, (47 random bits + multicast bit = 1)
  var _nodeId = [
    _seedBytes[0] | 0x01,
    _seedBytes[1], _seedBytes[2], _seedBytes[3], _seedBytes[4], _seedBytes[5]
  ];

  // Per 4.2.2, randomize (14 bit) clockseq
  var _clockseq = (_seedBytes[6] << 8 | _seedBytes[7]) & 0x3fff;

  // Previous uuid creation time
  var _lastMSecs = 0, _lastNSecs = 0;

  // See https://github.com/broofa/node-uuid for API details
  function v1(options, buf, offset) {
    var i = buf && offset || 0;
    var b = buf || [];

    options = options || {};

    var clockseq = options.clockseq != null ? options.clockseq : _clockseq;

    // UUID timestamps are 100 nano-second units since the Gregorian epoch,
    // (1582-10-15 00:00).  JSNumbers aren't precise enough for this, so
    // time is handled internally as 'msecs' (integer milliseconds) and 'nsecs'
    // (100-nanoseconds offset from msecs) since unix epoch, 1970-01-01 00:00.
    var msecs = options.msecs != null ? options.msecs : new Date().getTime();

    // Per 4.2.1.2, use count of uuid's generated during the current clock
    // cycle to simulate higher resolution clock
    var nsecs = options.nsecs != null ? options.nsecs : _lastNSecs + 1;

    // Time since last uuid creation (in msecs)
    var dt = (msecs - _lastMSecs) + (nsecs - _lastNSecs)/10000;

    // Per 4.2.1.2, Bump clockseq on clock regression
    if (dt < 0 && options.clockseq == null) {
      clockseq = clockseq + 1 & 0x3fff;
    }

    // Reset nsecs if clock regresses (new clockseq) or we've moved onto a new
    // time interval
    if ((dt < 0 || msecs > _lastMSecs) && options.nsecs == null) {
      nsecs = 0;
    }

    // Per 4.2.1.2 Throw error if too many uuids are requested
    if (nsecs >= 10000) {
      throw new Error('uuid.v1(): Can\'t create more than 10M uuids/sec');
    }

    _lastMSecs = msecs;
    _lastNSecs = nsecs;
    _clockseq = clockseq;

    // Per 4.1.4 - Convert from unix epoch to Gregorian epoch
    msecs += 12219292800000;

    // `time_low`
    var tl = ((msecs & 0xfffffff) * 10000 + nsecs) % 0x100000000;
    b[i++] = tl >>> 24 & 0xff;
    b[i++] = tl >>> 16 & 0xff;
    b[i++] = tl >>> 8 & 0xff;
    b[i++] = tl & 0xff;

    // `time_mid`
    var tmh = (msecs / 0x100000000 * 10000) & 0xfffffff;
    b[i++] = tmh >>> 8 & 0xff;
    b[i++] = tmh & 0xff;

    // `time_high_and_version`
    b[i++] = tmh >>> 24 & 0xf | 0x10; // include version
    b[i++] = tmh >>> 16 & 0xff;

    // `clock_seq_hi_and_reserved` (Per 4.2.2 - include variant)
    b[i++] = clockseq >>> 8 | 0x80;

    // `clock_seq_low`
    b[i++] = clockseq & 0xff;

    // `node`
    var node = options.node || _nodeId;
    for (var n = 0; n < 6; n++) {
      b[i + n] = node[n];
    }

    return buf ? buf : unparse(b);
  }

  // **`v4()` - Generate random UUID**

  // See https://github.com/broofa/node-uuid for API details
  function v4(options, buf, offset) {
    // Deprecated - 'format' argument, as supported in v1.2
    var i = buf && offset || 0;

    if (typeof(options) == 'string') {
      buf = options == 'binary' ? new BufferClass(16) : null;
      options = null;
    }
    options = options || {};

    var rnds = options.random || (options.rng || _rng)();

    // Per 4.4, set bits for version and `clock_seq_hi_and_reserved`
    rnds[6] = (rnds[6] & 0x0f) | 0x40;
    rnds[8] = (rnds[8] & 0x3f) | 0x80;

    // Copy bytes to buffer, if provided
    if (buf) {
      for (var ii = 0; ii < 16; ii++) {
        buf[i + ii] = rnds[ii];
      }
    }

    return buf || unparse(rnds);
  }

  // Export public API
  var uuid = v4;
  uuid.v1 = v1;
  uuid.v4 = v4;
  uuid.parse = parse;
  uuid.unparse = unparse;
  uuid.BufferClass = BufferClass;

  if (typeof define === 'function' && define.amd) {
    // Publish as AMD module
    define(function() {return uuid;});
  } else if (typeof(module) != 'undefined' && module.exports) {
    // Publish as node.js module
    module.exports = uuid;
  } else {
    // Publish as global (in browsers)
    var _previousRoot = _global.uuid;

    // **`noConflict()` - (browser only) to reset global 'uuid' var**
    uuid.noConflict = function() {
      _global.uuid = _previousRoot;
      return uuid;
    };

    _global.uuid = uuid;
  }
}).call(this);
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is actually a pretty interesting question, with a number of levels to it.

First, it's worth noting that uuid.js supports two different forms of id. uuid.v4() creates IDs using random numbers, while uuid.v1() creates IDs based on timestamps. The "version" of the id is actually encoded in the id itself, which guarantees that in theory no v4 id will ever collide with a v1 id. That's part of RFC4122, the UUID specification.

It's also worth noting that for v1 ids, each id source is supposed to have a unique "node id", also encoded in the id, that guarantees the uniqueness of id sequence created by that source. For id sources that have access to a guaranteed-unique value (e.g. a device's MAC address) this works well. However uuid.js doesn't have access to such a value and, thus, generates a random value for it's node id. This introduces the risk of it generating a node id that matches the one used by your server. The node id is 48-bit value, meaning the chance of a node id collision are 281,474,976,710,656:1. So, theres a chance, but it's pretty damn low.

... but none of that matters!

It turns out that even though NewSequentialID() produces IDs that are superficially similar to v1 IDs, Microsoft for whatever reasons decided to swap the various fields within the ID around, breaking RFC4122 compatability. What this means is that, depending on the sequence number, the IDs may or may not look like valid v1 ids, or valid v4 ids, or simply invalid UUIDs. I.e. using NewSequentialID() throws a wrench into the works if you want to talk about the possibility of uuid collision.

I'm not sure there's a simple way to quantify the risk of collision given this last issue. At the end of the day, UUIDs are 128-bit values, meaning there's a HUGE numberspace to draw from. For all but the most demanding of requirements you're probably okay. But there will be an increased risk of collision compared to what you'd have if you used an RFC-compliant UUID source.

[FWIW, your uuid.js comes from the node-uuid project (*cough* said the author).]

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, and sorry for forgetting where I got it. –  sheamus Dec 9 '13 at 14:47

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