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There's a situation where I get a compiler error for an implicit conversion if I do not include a Manifest:

import scala.language.implicitConversions

abstract class Thing[+A] {
  def get:A
}

case class SubThing[+A](a:A) extends Thing[A] {
  def get = a
}

object Thing {
  implicit def anyToThing[A](a:A):Thing[A] = SubThing(a)
}

object Funcs {
  def f(x:Thing[Int]) = x.get + 1
  def f(x:Thing[Double]) = x.get + 1.0
}

object Main {
  def main(args:Array[String]) = {
    println(Funcs.f(1))
  }
}

will give

error: ambiguous reference to overloaded definition,
       both method f in object Funcs of type (x: Thing[Double])Double
       and  method f in object Funcs of type (x: Thing[Int])Int
       match argument types (Int) and expected result type Any
println(Funcs.f(1))
              ^

However, if I pass in an implicit Manifest for A in the implicit conversion:

import scala.language.implicitConversions

abstract class Thing[+A] {
  def get:A
}

case class SubThing[+A](a:A) extends Thing[A] {
  def get = a
}

object Thing {
  implicit def anyToThing[A:Manifest](a:A):Thing[A] = SubThing(a)
}

object Funcs {
  def f(x:Thing[Int]) = x.get + 1
  def f(x:Thing[Double]) = x.get + 1.0
}

object Main {
  def main(args:Array[String]) = {
    println(Funcs.f(1))
  }
}

Causes the code to compile fine. Why is this the case? There's a real example of this in our codebase, which gives a lot of 'no Manifest for T' errors if you're relying on the implicit conversion in generic situations, which are eliminated by creating the wrapper class explicitly; however if we could just get the Manifest out of that implicit conversion that would be ideal. Why is it required, or is there another way to accomplish the same thing while avoiding Manifests?

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2 Answers 2

I believe this happens because once converted to Thing, type erasure kicks in and its no longer a Thing[Int] or Thing[Double] but a Thing[_] and hence the following method overloading does not work.

object Funcs {
  def f(x:Thing[Int]) = x.get + 1
  def f(x:Thing[Double]) = x.get + 1.0
}

The manifest is where my understanding breaks down a little because I have never dealt with it much, but I guess it presevies the type so that the method overloading works.

You could work around this with macros I believe, although that would preclude calling Funcs.f() on anything the compiler didnt know for sure was an Int or Double.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This was caused by scala's automatic promotion of Ints to Double, which made the implicit conversion ambiguous. When the manifest is included, it creates an implicit parameter that causes the function resolution to become unambiguous, just as DummyImplicit implicit parameters are used to combat overloaded-function ambiguity that's due to the type erasure as Ivan mentioned.

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