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I'm creating a database, and prototyping and benchmarking first. I am using H2, an open-source, commercially free, embeddable, relational, java database. I am not currently indexing on any column.

After the database grew to about 5GB, its batch write speed doubled (the rate of writing was slowed 2x the original rate). I was writing roughly 25 rows per milliseconds with a fresh, clean database and now at 7GB I'm writing roughly 7 rows/ms. My rows consist of a short, an int, a float, and a byte[5].

I do not know much about database internals or even how H2 was programmed. I would also like to note I'm not badmouthing H2, since this is a problem with other DBMSs I've tested.

What factors might slow down the database like this if there's no indexing overhead? Does it mainly have something to do with the file system structure? From my results, I assume the way windows XP and ntfs handle files makes it slower to append data to the end of a file as the file grows.

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9 Answers

One factor that can complicate inserts as a database grows is the number of indexes on the table, and the depth of those indexes if they are B-trees or similar. There's simply more work to do, and it may be that you're causing index nodes to split, or you may simply have moved from, say, a 5-level B-tree to a 6-level one (or. more generally, from N to N+1 levels).

Another factor could be disk space usage -- if you are using cooked files (that's the normal kind for most people most of the time; some DBMS use 'raw files' on Unix, but it is unlikely that your embedded system would do so, and you'd know if it did because you'd have to tell it to do so), it could be that your bigger tables are now fragmented across the disk, leading to worse performance.

If the problem was on SELECT performance, there could be many other factors also affecting your system's performance.

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interesting, I didn't think of the file being fragmented across the disk, but I suppose it must be if it's that big! –  Tim Sullivan Oct 10 '08 at 22:19
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This sounds about right. Database performance usually drops significantly as the data can no longer be held in memory and operations become disk bound. If you are using normal insert operations, and want a significant performance improvement, I suggest using some sort of a bulk load API if H2 supports it (like Oracle sqlldr, Sybase BCP, Mysql 'load data infile'). This type of API writes data directly to the data-file bypassing many of the database subsystems.

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This is most likely caused by variable width fields. I don't know if H2 allows this, but in MySQL, you have to create your table with all fixed width fields, then explicitly declare it as a fixed width field table. This allows MySQL to calculate exactly where it needs to go in the database file to do the insert. If you aren't using a fixed width table, then it has to read through the table to find the end of the last row.

Appending data (if done right) is an O(n) operation, where n is the length of the data to be written. It doesn't depend on the file length, there are seek operations to skip over that easily.

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I did forget to mention that my byte[5] field is actually sitting in a blob field (variable length field). That may have something to do with it. Thank you for your quick responses, all of you. –  Jeff Atwood Oct 10 '08 at 21:49
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For most databases, appending to a database file is definitely slower than pre-growing the file and then adding rows. See if H2 supports pre-growing the file.

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Regardless of whether or not this is the problem, it sounds like it'd be a good idea to pre-grow it. Thanks! –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 10 '08 at 21:51
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Another cause is whether the entire database is held in memory or if the OS has to do a lot of disk swapping to find the location to store the record.

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I would blame it on I/O, specially if you're running your database on a normal PC with a normal hard disk (by that I mean not in server with super fast hard drives, etc).

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Many database engines create an implicit integer primary key for each update, so even if you haven't declared any indexes, your table is still indexed. This may be a factor.

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Using H2 for 7G datafile is a wrong choice from technological point of view. As you said, embeddable. What kind of "embedded" application do you have, if you need to store so much data.

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Are you performing incremental commits? Since H2 is an ACID compliant database, if you are not performing incremental commits, then there is some type of redo log so that in the case of some accidental failure (say, power outage) or rollback, the deletes can be rolled back.

In that case, your redo log may be growing large and overflowing memory buffers and needing to write out your redo log to disk, as well as your actual data, adding to your I/O overhead.

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