Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Question:
Updated: Why does inserting a row into table A with a foreign key constraint to table B and then updating the row in table B that the inserted row in table A references in a transaction cause a deadlock?

Scenario:

  • reservation.time_slot_id has a foreign key constraint to time_slot.id.
  • When a reservation is made the following SQL is run:

    BEGIN TRANSACTION   
    INSERT INTO reservations (..., time_slot_id) VALUES (..., $timeSlotID)
    UPDATE reservations SET num_reservations = 5 WHERE id = $timeSlotID
    COMMIT
    
  • I am load testing my server with about 100 concurrent users, each making a reservation for the same time slot (same $timeSlotID for each user).

  • If I don't use a transaction (remove cn.setAutoCommit(false);, cn.commit(), etc.) this problem does not occur.


Environment:

  • PostgreSQL 9.2.4
  • Tomcat v7.0
  • JDK 1.7.0_40
  • commons-dbcp-1.4.jar
  • commons-pool-1.6.jar
  • postgresql-9.2-1002.jdbc4.jar


Code:

// endpoint start
// there are some other SELECT ... LEFT JOIN ... WHERE ... queries up here but they don't seem to be related
...

// create a reservation in the time slot then increment the count

cn.setAutoCommit(false);
try
{
    st = cn.prepareStatement("INSERT INTO reservation (time_slot_id, email, created_timestamp) VALUES (?, ?, ?)");
    st.setInt   (1, timeSlotID); // timeSlotID is the same for every user
    st.setString(2, email);
    st.setInt   (3, currentTimestamp);

    st.executeUpdate();
    st.close();

    st = cn.prepareStatement("UPDATE time_slot SET num_reservations = 5 WHERE id = ?"); // set to 5 instead of incrementing for testing
    st.setInt(1, timeSlotID); // timeSlotID is the same for every user

    st.executeUpdate();
    st.close();

    cn.commit();
}
catch (SQLException e)
{
    cn.rollback();
    ...
}
finally
{
    cn.setAutoCommit(true);
}

...
// endpoint end


PSQL Error:

ERROR:  deadlock detected
DETAIL:  Process 27776 waits for ExclusiveLock on tuple (2,179) of relation 49817 of database 49772; blocked by process 27795.
    Process 27795 waits for ShareLock on transaction 3962; blocked by process 27777.
    Process 27777 waits for ExclusiveLock on tuple (2,179) of relation 49817 of database 49772; blocked by process 27776.
    Process 27776: UPDATE time_slot SET num_reservations = 5 WHERE id = $1
    Process 27795: UPDATE time_slot SET num_reservations = 5 WHERE id = $1
    Process 27777: UPDATE time_slot SET num_reservations = 5 WHERE id = $1
HINT:  See server log for query details.
STATEMENT:  UPDATE time_slot SET num_reservations = 5 WHERE id = $1
share|improve this question
    
What are the values for timeSlotID, most likely they are attempting to update the same record. –  Mark Rotteveel Oct 11 '13 at 7:44
    
What are you referring to by "they"? The code inside the try block is the complete code. So, timeSlotID is the same value for both queries. If "they" are the user sessions from the load testing then you are correct. Looking back at my load test now; the random timeSlotId was not random and was choosing the same timeSlotId for every "user". So yes, every "user" was trying to update the same time_slot row at the same time. But why does this problem only exist when using Transactions? –  Mike Oct 11 '13 at 15:54
    
I see that, but you are executing this with 100 concurrent sessions, if any of those sessions use the same timeSlotID that could introduce a deadlock –  Mark Rotteveel Oct 11 '13 at 15:56
    
Please see my updated comment above (I accidentally submitted before I was ready). Why does executing both queries in a transaction cause the deadlock but executing them individually does not? –  Mike Oct 11 '13 at 16:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How the foreign key can cause a deadlock (in Postgresql 9.2 and below).

Let sey there is a child table referencing to a parent table:

CREATE TABLE time_slot(
  id int primary key, 
  num_reservations int
);

CREATE TABLE reservation(
  time_slot_id int, 
  created_timestamp timestamp,
  CONSTRAINT time_slot_fk FOREIGN KEY (time_slot_id)
     REFERENCES time_slot( id )
);

INSERT INTO time_slot values( 1, 0 );
INSERT INTO time_slot values( 2, 0 );

Suppose that the FK column in child table is modified in session one, that fires ordinary insert statement (to test this behaviour, open one session in SQL Shell (psql) and turn autocommit off, or start the transacion using begin statement:

BEGIN;
INSERT INTO reservation VALUES( 2, now() );

When the FK column in child table is modified, DBMS will have to lookup the parent table to ensure the existance of the parent record.

If inserted value doesn't exists in the referenced (parent) table - DBMS breaks the transaction and reports an error.

In case the value exists, the record is inserted into child table, but DBMS has to ensure the transaction integrity - no other transaction can delete or modify referenced record in the parent table, until the transaction ends (until INSERT into child table is commited).

PostgreSql 9.2 (and below) ensure database integrity in a such case placing a read share lock on a record in the parent table. The read share lock doesn't prevents readers from reading locked record from the table, but prevent's writers from modyfying locked record in the shared mode.

OK - now we have a new record in the child table insered by session 1 (there is a write lock placed on this record by session 1), and the read share lock placed on the record 2 in the parent table. The transaction is not yet commitet.

Suppose that a session 2 starts the same transaction, that references the same record in the parent table:

BEGIN;
INSERT INTO reservation VALUES( 2, now() );

The query executes fine, without any errors - it inserts a new record into the child table, and also places a shared read lock on the record 2 in the parent table. Shared locks don't conflict, many transactions can lock a record in a shared read mode and don't have to wait for others (only write locks conflict).

Now (a few miliseconds later) the session 1 fires (as a part of the same transaction) this command:

UPDATE time_slot
SET num_reservations = num_reservations + 1
WHERE id = 2;

In Postgres 9.2 the above command "hangs" and is waiting for the shared lock placed by session 2.

And now, suppose that the same command, a few miliseconds later, is running in session 2:

UPDATE time_slot
SET num_reservations = num_reservations + 1
WHERE id = 2;

This command is supposed to "hang" and should wait for a write lock placed on the record by UPDATE from session 1.

But the result is:

BŁĄD:  wykryto zakleszczenie
SZCZEGÓŁY:  Proces 5604 oczekuje na ExclusiveLock na krotka (0,2) relacji 41363 bazy danych 16393; zablokowany przez 381
6.
Proces 3816 oczekuje na ShareLock na transakcja 1036; zablokowany przez 5604.
PODPOWIEDŹ:  Przejrzyj dziennik serwera by znaleźć szczegóły zapytania.

("zakleszczenie" means "deadlock", "BŁĄD" means "ERROR")

  • the update command from session 2 is trying to place a write lock on the record 2 locked by session 1
  • session 1 is trying to place a write lock on the same record, locked (in the shared mode) by session 2
  • ----> ...... deadlock.

    The deadlock can be prevented by placing a write lock on the parent table using SELECT FOR UPDATE

    The above test case will not cause the deadlock in PostgreSQL 9.3 (try it) - in 9.3 they improved locking behaviour in such cases.



------------ EDIT - additional questions -------------------

why does the insert statement not release the lock after it is done? Or does it remain for the entire transaction which is why not using a transaction does not cause a deadlock?

All statements that modify data within the transaction (insert, update, delete) place locks on modified records. These locks remain active until the transaction ends - by issuing commit or rollback.

Because autocommit is turned off in the JDBC connection, successive SQL commands are automaticaly grouped into one transaction

The explanation is here:
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/sql/Connection.html#setAutoCommit%28boolean%29

If a connection is in auto-commit mode, then all its SQL statements will be executed and committed as individual transactions. Otherwise, its SQL statements are grouped into transactions that are terminated by a call to either the method commit or the method rollback.



How does the SELECT FOR UPDATE prevent the deadlock?


SELECT FOR UPDATE places a write lock on the record. This is the first command in the whole transaction, and the lock is placed in the beginning. When another transaction starts (in another session), is also executes SELECT FOR UPDATE, trying to lock the same record. Write locks conflict - two transactions cannot lock the same record at the same time - therefore the SELECT FOR UPDATE of the second transaction is hold, and is waiting until the first transaction releases the lock (by issuing commit or rollback) - actually the second transaction is waiting until the whole first transaction ends.

In the first scenario, the INSERT statements places two locks:
- a write lock on the inserted record in the reservation table
- and a read shared lock on the record in the time_slot table referenced by the foreign key constraint

Read shared locks don't conflict - two and more transactions can lock the same record in the shared mode, and can continue execution - then don't have to wait for each other. But later, when the UPDATE is issued within the same transaction, trying to place a write lock on the same record already locked in the shared mode, this cause a deadlock.


Would placing the increment first also prevent the deadlock?


Yes, you are right. This prevents the deadlock, because a write lock is placed on the record at the beginning of the transaction. Another transaction also tries to update the same record at the beginning, and has to wait at this point because the record is already locked (in write mode) by another session.

share|improve this answer
    
This is great and exactly what I was looking for! Still some questions though: why does the insert statement not release the lock after it is done? Or does it remain for the entire transaction which is why not using a transaction does not cause a deadlock? How does the SELECT FOR UPDATE prevent the deadlock? Would placing the increment first also prevent the deadlock? –  Mike Oct 12 '13 at 6:41
    
I've added to my answer some comments to additional questions. –  kordirko Oct 12 '13 at 9:21
    
Thanks for the additional info, I think I understand now. Again, thanks for your time and elegant answer. –  Mike Oct 12 '13 at 15:49

While I still don't understand it, I added:

SELECT * FROM time_slot WHERE id = ? FOR UPDATE

as the first statement in the transaction. This seems to have solved my problem as I no longer get a deadlock.

I would still love for someone to give a proper answer and explain this to me.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess there is a foreign key constraint on reservation table column that references time_slot table, if yes, it causes a deadlock. –  kordirko Oct 11 '13 at 17:48
    
That is correct. I had not thought of that. I was incorrectly assuming the insertion into the reservation table was not related to the issue because it was a different table, but I had forgotten about the foreign key constraint. Can anyone tell me how the foreign key constraints causes this deadlock? –  Mike Oct 11 '13 at 20:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.