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I have a question about which style is preferred: std::bind Vs lambda in C++0x. I know that they serve -somehow- different purposes but lets take an example of intersecting functionality.

Using lambda:

uniform_int<> distribution(1, 6);
mt19937 engine;
// lambda style
auto dice = [&]() { return distribution(engine); };

Using bind:

uniform_int<> distribution(1, 6);
mt19937 engine;
// bind style
auto dice = bind(distribution, engine);

Which one should we prefer? why? assuming more complex situations compared to the mentioned example. i.e. What are the advantages/disadvantages of one over the other?

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1  
are there any performance differences? speed, memory consumption, heap usage? –  deft_code Dec 19 '09 at 3:33
    
@Caspin I don't really know if there is a difference in performance/memory consumption between these two tools :) –  AraK Dec 19 '09 at 4:54
4  
btw: the two versions are not equivalent because bind copies arguments. Alternative: bind(ref(distribution),ref(engine)) –  sellibitze Dec 19 '09 at 10:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

As you said, bind and lambdas don't quite exactly aim at the same goal.

For instance, for using and composing STL algorithms, lambdas are clear winners, IMHO.

To illustrate, I remember a really funny answer, here on stack overflow, where someone asked for ideas of hex magic numbers, (like OxDEADBEEF, OxCAFEBABE, OxDEADDEAD etc.) and was told that if he were a real C++ programmer he would simply have download a list of English words and use a simple one-liner of C++ :)

#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <boost/lambda/lambda.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/bind.hpp>

int main()
{
    using namespace boost::lambda;
    std::ifstream ifs("wordsEn.txt");
    std::remove_copy_if(
        std::istream_iterator<std::string>(ifs),
        std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
        std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"),
        bind(&std::string::size, _1) != 8u
            ||
        bind(
            static_cast<std::string::size_type (std::string::*)(const char*, std::string::size_type) const>(
                &std::string::find_first_not_of
            ),
            _1,
            "abcdef",
            0u
        ) != std::string::npos
    );
}

This snippet, in pure C++98, open the English words file, scan each word and print only those of length 8 with 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e' or 'f' letters.

Now, turn on C++0X and lambda :

#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main()
{
 std::ifstream ifs("wordsEn.txt");
 std::copy_if(
    std::istream_iterator<std::string>(ifs),
    std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
    std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"),
    [](const std::string& s)
    {
       return (s.size() == 8 && 
               s.find_first_not_of("abcdef") == std::string::npos);
    }
 );
}

This is still a bit heavy to read (mainly because of the istream_iterator business), but a lot simpler than the bind version :)

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Although the two pieces of code don't do the same thing, I got your point of view very clearly :) –  AraK Dec 19 '09 at 4:56
4  
the lambda should be: [](const std::string& s) -> bool –  Matthieu N. Dec 19 '09 at 11:00
9  
@Beh Tou Cheh I think the type should be deduced if lambda consists of return <expression>; only(as Thomas did). –  AraK Dec 19 '09 at 11:09

C++0x lambdas are monomorphic, while bind can be polymorphic. You cannot have something like

auto f = [](auto a, auto b) { cout << a << ' ' << b; }
f("test", 1.2f);

a and b must have known types. On the other hand, tr1/boost/phoenix/lambda bind allows you to do this:

struct foo
{
  typedef void result_type;

  template < typename A, typename B >
  void operator()(A a, B b)
  {
    cout << a << ' ' << b;
  }
};

auto f = bind(foo(), _1, _2);
f("test", 1.2f); // will print "test 1.2"

Note that the types A and B are not fixed here. Only when f is actually used these two will be deduced.

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Why not just declare the lambda with explicitly-typed parameters? That would be a vast improvement over the bind solution shown above. Also, if you have more complex functionality that you want to reuse, lambda is still better than bind, since it doesn't require a struct, even if you want to bind state into the functor: template<...>foo(A a, B b, int state){ cout ... << state; } ... auto f = [](const char* a, float b){ foo(a, b, 42); };. –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 7 '11 at 3:17
2  
@Marcelo Cantos: The statement to prove was that "C++0x lambdas are monomorphic", precisely because you must declare the lambda with explicitly-typed parameters. –  MSalters Apr 7 '11 at 9:15
3  
@Marcelo Cantos: It shows a difference between the two. AraK asked about differences and benefits/drawbacks of bind vs. lambda. –  dv_ Apr 8 '11 at 10:25
1  
@trinithis: It does not give a type error, since f is a functor with a templated call operator. –  dv_ Jan 30 '12 at 11:41
4  
In C++14 even this difference will disappear -- a lambda could be declared as [](auto x){} –  zymzam Jan 23 at 23:03

The C++ 0x lamdba syntax is more readable than the bind syntax. Once you get into more than 2-3 level bind, you code becomes pretty much unreadable and difficult to maintain. I would prefer the more intuitive lambda syntax.

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One of the benefits of lambdas is they are way more useful when you need to add a little big of logic on top of an existing function.

With bind, you are forced to create a new function/method/functor even if the logic is only ever needed in this one place. You need to come up with an appropriate name and it can make the code less understandable as it potentially makes you split up related logic.

With lambda, you can add the new logic inside the lambda (but are not forced to if it makes sense to create a new callable).

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1  
+1. I had to close a vector of FILE* in a dtor. Instead of being able to use a lambda [](FILE* f) { if(f) fclose(f); } I had to create a named function and use that. The function appeared in the private part of the class and was thus separated by many lines from the for_each call –  KitsuneYMG Dec 19 '09 at 9:15

I think it's more a matter of taste. People that quickly grasp new technologies, or are familiar with functional programming will probably prefer lambda syntax, while more conservative programmers will definitively prefer bind, as it is more in par with the traditional C++ syntax.

Such a decision should be made in coordination with the people that will be working with the code, probably through a majority vote.

Which doesn't change the fact however, that lambda syntax is much more powerful and cleaner.

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3  
People in a team keep changing. Code readability is very important esp. for future maintenance programmers. Hence we should go with whichever solution that offers more readability and between lamdba and bind, lamda definitely takes the cake. –  posharma Dec 18 '09 at 22:25

C++0x lambdas essentially replace bind. There is nothing you can bind that you can't recreate a trivial wrapper lambda to achieve the same. std::tr1::bind will go the way of std::bind1st, etc once lambda support is wide spread. Which is good, because for some reason most programmers have a hard time getting their head around bind.

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1  
Lambdas cannot do everything that std::bind does, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/15598607/when-should-i-use-stdbind –  gnzlbg Mar 24 '13 at 17:30

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