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Okay, so C is pass-by-value, which means a copy of the variable is used instead of the original variable for the parameter, right? So, will that copy always have the same memory address? Consider this code:

void test(int *ptr) {   
    printf("&ptr: %p\n", &ptr);
    printf("ptr: %p\n", ptr);
    printf("*ptr: %d\n\n", *ptr);
}

int main() {
    int a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, e = 5;
    test(&a);
    test(&b);
    test(&c);
    test(&d);
    test(&e);

    return 0;
}

The output I get from this code is this:

&ptr: 0x7fff70536728
ptr: 0x7fff7053674c
*ptr: 1

&ptr: 0x7fff70536728
ptr: 0x7fff70536750
*ptr: 2

&ptr: 0x7fff70536728
ptr: 0x7fff70536754
*ptr: 3

&ptr: 0x7fff70536728
ptr: 0x7fff70536758
*ptr: 4

&ptr: 0x7fff70536728
ptr: 0x7fff7053675c
*ptr: 5

My gut feeling was "no". It is my understanding that the ptr doesn't exist outside the code block of test(). So, why is &ptr the same for all five function calls?

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4  
It is not guaranteed to be the same. You are observing unspecified behavior. (You can see the address change if you call it from another function in addition to main.) –  Raymond Chen Oct 11 '13 at 2:54
    
and it may not exhibit this behavior at all, even without an intervening function call. depending on the implementation on a particular machine. –  Andyz Smith Oct 11 '13 at 2:56
    
@AndyzSmith also depending on how the compiler decides to implement it. :) –  jmstoker Oct 11 '13 at 2:57
    
@jmstoker i wonder what happens if you do this on ideone.com? –  Andyz Smith Oct 11 '13 at 2:59
    
@AndyzSmith The behavior is the same. I'm not surprised though. It would be silly for the compiler not to see that the local pointer is reused and just reuse it. After the code is compiled everything is global, so why not just reuse an address instead of creating a new one each time. –  jmstoker Oct 11 '13 at 3:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

&ptr is the same because ptr is a local variable within test(). Since you're calling test() five times in succession without anything intervening, it's just being given the same address on the stack every time it's called (note, this isn't in any way required by C - it's just how your machine is doing it, and how it would usually happen).

If you called a second function which then itself called test(), you would not get the same output for &ptr, since that space on the stack in which ptr was previously residing is now being used by the intervening function call.

For instance:

#include <stdio.h>

void test(int *ptr) {
    printf("&ptr: %p\n", (void *) &ptr);
    printf("ptr: %p\n", (void *) ptr);
    printf("*ptr: %d\n\n", *ptr);
}

void test_test(void) {
    int a = 1;
    test(&a);
}

int main() {
    int a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, e = 5;

    test(&a);
    test(&b);
    test(&c);
    test(&d);
    test(&e);
    test_test();

    return 0;
}

yields:

paul@local:~/src/c/scratch$ ./ptrtest
&ptr: 0x7fff39f79068
ptr: 0x7fff39f7909c
*ptr: 1

&ptr: 0x7fff39f79068
ptr: 0x7fff39f79098
*ptr: 2

&ptr: 0x7fff39f79068
ptr: 0x7fff39f79094
*ptr: 3

&ptr: 0x7fff39f79068
ptr: 0x7fff39f79090
*ptr: 4

&ptr: 0x7fff39f79068
ptr: 0x7fff39f7908c
*ptr: 5

&ptr: 0x7fff39f79048
ptr: 0x7fff39f7906c
*ptr: 1

paul@local:~/src/c/scratch$

and you can see that &ptr is different on the last call, which is made via test_test().

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Ah okay, makes sense now. Thanks! –  instagatorTheCheese Oct 11 '13 at 3:03

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