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I'm sure this has to do with my lack of understanding of Ruby internals, but here goes:

Essentially I want to be able to set an 'attachments directory' within my assets folder by simply calling has_attachments_folder "videos" near the top of the model. Don't worry about what the method's purpose is, I have that part of it working. Example usage below.

Video.rb

class Video < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_attachment_assets_folder "videos"
end

Email.rb

class Email < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_attachment_assets_folder "attachments/email"
end

activerecord_base.rb

def self.has_attachment_assets_folder(physical_path, arguments={})
    ActiveRecord::Base.send :define_method, :global_assets_path do |args={}|
        # Default to using the absolute system file path unless the argument
        # :asset_path => true is supplied
        p = "#{ Rails.root }/app/assets/#{ physical_path }"
        if args[:asset_path]
            p = "/assets/#{ physical_path.include?("/") ? physical_path.partition("/")[2..-1].join("/") : physical_path }"
        end
        p.squeeze!("/")
        logger.info "Defining global_assets_path...class name: #{ self.class.name }, physical_path: #{ physical_path }, p: #{ p }"
        p
    end
end

So essentially the method global_assets_path should return the full or relative path to the attachments directory specified by the call to has_attachment_assets_folder.

has_attachment_assets_folder "videos", :asset_path => true = "/assets/videos" has_attachment_assets_folder "attachments/email", :asset_path => true = "/assets/attachments/email"

The thing is, if I use it in a regular context of a Rails app (one model being accessed at a time) it works just fine. However I'm running a major migration which requires me to use multiple models at once in the migration file. It seems that each model shares the method global_assets_path because the following happens:

Example 1

Email.all.each do |e|
    puts e.global_assets_path(:asset_path => true) # Correct output of "/assets/attachments/email"
end
Video.all.each do |v|
    puts v.global_assets_path(:asset_path => true) # Correct output of "/assets/video"
end

Example 2

test = Video.pluck(:category)
Email.all.each do |e|
    puts e.global_assets_path(:asset_path => true) # Correct output of "/assets/attachments/email"
end
Video.all.each do |v|
    puts v.global_assets_path(:asset_path => true) # Incorrect output of "/assets/attachments/email" because the Video model was instantiated for the first time on the 1st line.
end
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're calling define_method on the wrong thing. This:

ActiveRecord::Base.send :define_method, :global_assets_path

is sending define_method to ActiveRecord::Base so that exact global_assets_path method will be added to ActiveRecord::Base. When you say this:

class Email < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_attachment_assets_folder "attachments/email"
end

you want to add your global_assets_path method to Email, not ActiveRecord::Base. self will be Email inside that has_attachment_assets_folder call so you want to say:

def self.has_attachment_assets_folder(physical_path, arguments = {})
    define_method :global_assets_path do |args={}|
        ...
    end
end

to define global_assets_path on self (the ActiveRecord::Base subclass) and leave ActiveRecord::Base itself alone.

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