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I have a design like this:

public class Employee {
    //...
}

public class Company {
    private IList<Employee> _employees;

    public IList<Employee> Employees {
        get { return _employees; }
        set {
            if (_employees == value) {
                return;
            }

            _employees = value;

            //Some logic here. Eg:
            //Raise PropertyChanged
            //Iterate over the new values to suscribe to some events, etc.
        }
    }
}

when I try to do something like:

var employees = session.Query<Company>().Fetch(x => x.Employees).ToList();

it throws a LazyInitializationException:

illegal access to loading collection

The only workaround I've found is moving the logic to a method, making this method public (and virtual) and calling the method for every instance in employees, but I don't like that since I will be calling that method from my repositories.

Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

You are mixing fetching data from the database with control logic. I'd recommend fetching the data into simple value objects. Then transform it into your Company and Employee logic-laden classes afterwards. That way you separate data entities from functionality based on that data.

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In Nhibernate you collection class should not be exposed to the out side world. Your typical domain would look like this

public class Company
{
    public virtual String Id { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Employee> Employees { get; protected set; }

    public Company()
    {
        Employees = new List<Employee>();
    }

    public void AddEmployee(Employee employee)
    {
        if (Employees.Contains(employee))
            return;

        Employees.Add(employee);
        employee.Company = this;
    }

    public void RemoveEmployee(Employee employee)
    {
        if (!Employees.Contains(employee))
            return;

        Employees.Remove(employee);
    }
}

public class Employee
{
    public virtual String Id { get; set; }
    public virtual String FullName { get; set; }
    public virtual Company Company { get; set; }
}

I agree with the first responder who said to user view models and INPC those, but if you want to bind directly to your domain objects, you can inject INPC directly into your domain objects.

Please see this original post from Ayende and this updated one from Ricardo

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I guess you are using 'property' as collection accessor in your mapping, if so the behavior you describe is the expected one when your code tries to modify the collection.

If you want to use that pattern in your domain model, you should change collection accessor to 'field' (with the appropriate naming strategy), in order to tell NHibernate to set the backing field '_employees' and not the property 'Employees'.

This will not trigger your code that tries to access the collection anymore.

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I thought about that, but then when should I execute that logic? I have it in the setter to make sure that when new employees are set, I do some required actions. Otherwise how would I know that new employees were assigned? –  Oscar Mederos Oct 16 '13 at 19:35
    
It's correct to have that logic in the setter. Changing the accessor eliminates the initialization troubles, but let your code to be triggered anyway after initializazion. The key concept is that you should not need that code on initialization, because the persisted object has to be considered to be in a valid state before persist and NHibernate will reconstruct that state only. –  Andrea Montemaggio Oct 19 '13 at 9:38
    
I don't think I understand you. If I set a custom access (eg. LowerCaseField with underscore prefix), it never calls the setter of my properties (neither before or after initialization), so my logic is never executed. Are you saying it is supposed to call the setter property once it is properly initialized? –  Oscar Mederos Oct 21 '13 at 0:17

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