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Are there legitimate uses for JavaScript’s “with” statement?

I recently discovered that in javascript, one can do something like the following:

with document{
    write('foo');
    body.scrollTop = x;
}

The down side of this is that each variable needs to be checked to see if it belongs to the document object, creating a significant overhead.

Alternatively, one could do something like this:

var d = document;
d.write('foo');
d.body.scrollTop = x;

Are there any situations where the use of the 'with' keyword is justified?

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marked as duplicate by Alex Rozanski, outis, John McCollum, Abel, cobbal Dec 19 '09 at 0:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Dupe stackoverflow.com/questions/61552/… –  Alex Rozanski Dec 18 '09 at 23:11
    
Dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/61552/… –  outis Dec 18 '09 at 23:11
2  
Wow, even duplicate comments :) Thanks, I searched, but couldn't find anythin here on the subject. –  John McCollum Dec 18 '09 at 23:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here are some blog posts in support of the with keyword. But please read the YUI blog entry that azazul posted as well!

http://webreflection.blogspot.com/2009/12/with-worlds-most-misunderstood.html http://webreflection.blogspot.com/2009/12/with-some-good-example.html

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2  
+1, think your answer really answers the "where is it justified" question, instead of pointing at the "why shouldn't you use it". –  Abel Dec 18 '09 at 23:19
    
@Abel, you're right, this answers my question nicely as well as sticking a giant caveat on there too. –  John McCollum Dec 18 '09 at 23:24
    
@Annie: I think you should paste some quotes here instead of simply linking two related articles. What if they lead to a 404 (or similar) HTTP code later (e.g. because these articles were moved/deleted)? –  Sk8erPeter Jan 20 at 15:37

just dont use it : http://yuiblog.com/blog/2006/04/11/with-statement-considered-harmful/

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1  
+1, that was the link I was looking for –  cobbal Dec 18 '09 at 23:10
1  
I can't express this enough: any "with"-like syntax, like the one for JavaScript and Delphi, where you're not explicitly specifying which identifiers belong to the "scoped" object, and which one aren't, are evil, don't use that syntax in those languages. In particular, future changes might change the behavior of that code without warning. If that isn't a bug just waiting to happen, then I don't know what is. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 18 '09 at 23:12
    
+1, because it's the same link I typed in while yours was already there. Deleting mine ;-). –  Abel Dec 18 '09 at 23:14
1  
For instance, Visual Basic.NET got it right, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wc500chb(VS.80).aspx, where they force you to prefix all identifiers belonging to the scoped object with a dot. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 18 '09 at 23:14
1  
@John: the only justification I can find is where code becomes clearer when using it. If you find yourself in such a situation, you can use it... –  Abel Dec 18 '09 at 23:17

Despite advice to the contrary almost everywhere, I think that there are uses for "with". For example, I'm working on a domain model framework for Javascript, which uses the underscore character in much the same way that jQuery uses "$". This means that without "with", I have lots of underscores scattered through my code in ways that make it less readable. Here's a random line from an application using the framework:

_.People().sort(_.score(_.isa(_.Parent)),'Surname','Forename');

whereas with "with" it would look like

with (_) {
    ...

    People().sort(score(isa(Parent)),'Surname','Forename');

    ...
}

What would be really useful is a read-only version of "with".

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Not always SLOWER runtime give you side effects. Its negligible if you don't run it thousand times. –  kroe Jan 29 at 11:55

I would avoid using it in production code because it's ambiguous but there is an alternative solution to the for-loop-closure solution by using with to mimic the let binding, here's a copy of my previous answer:

An alternative to the standard closure solution using functions inside of a for loop:

<a  href="#">blah</a><br>
<a  href="#">blah</a><br>
<a  href="#">foo</a><br>
<script>
    (function() {
    var anchors = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
        for ( var i = anchors.length; i--; ) {
            var link = anchors[i];
            with ({ number: i }) {
    	        link.onclick = function() {
       	            alert(number);
    	        };
            }
        }
    })();
</script>

Credit to nlogax for providing a solution which I pretty much ripped off: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1451009/javascript-infamous-loop-problem

Here's the standard solution:

<script>
    (function() {
    var anchors = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
    for ( var i = anchors.length; i--; ) {
        var link = anchors[i];
        (function(i) {
    	    link.onclick = function() {
    	        alert(i)
    	    }
        })(i);
    }
    })();
</script>
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Please make sure you state what part is "ambiguous", as the JavaScript interpreter and/or compiler is never confused about what to use for the identifier. It's future changes and/or what a programmer might interpret an identifier as that is the problem. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 18 '09 at 23:16

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