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I want to generate 100k random numbers, this is what I have come up with:

from random import randrange, seed

f=open("tree.in","w")
s=set()

seed(99)
for _ in xrange(1,10**5):
    while True:
        x=randrange(10**6)
        if x not in s:
            s.add(x)
            break

for x in s:
    f.write(str(x)+"\n")

f.close()

Unfortunately the numbers in the file are clustered up like this:

524369
524372
786520
786523
786526
98
524387
106
108
111
786544
786549

I could add them to a list and have a random ordering but it wastes space.
Is there an elegant way to fix this issue?
(I'm not sure if cygwin has anything to do with this issue)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd recommend using random.sample for this:

>>> import random
>>> s = random.sample(xrange(1, 10 ** 6), 10 ** 5)
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Python's set type does not preserve order. The order of elements in a set depends on the insertion order and the hashes of the elements you add. CPython (the most popular implementation of Python) uses the identity function as the hash function for integers (except for -1, which gets hashed to -2 for internal reasons). As a result of this simple hash function, you get the "clustering" you observe.

The solution is to use a list of results *alongisde" with the set to keep the results in the order you generate them. Or simply use random.sample(), which already is an optimised implementation of this alogrithm doing the right thing.

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Not sure if you care for randomised seeds (but I prefer them), but add a step component to it and you'll get much better results. For instance:

from random import randrange, randint, seed
import time

f=open("tree.in","w")
s=set()

seed(randint(1,10**6)
for _ in xrange(1,10**5):
    while True:
        x=randrange(randint(1,10**5), 10**8, randint(1,10**5))
        if x not in s:
            s.add(x)
            break

for x in s:
    f.write(str(x)+"\n")

f.close()
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