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Why can I not do the following?

public interface ICommunication
{
    int Send(Dictionary<string, string> d);
    int Send(byte[] b);

    Dictionary<string, string> Receive();
    byte[] Receive(); // Error
}

The signarure of Receive() is different but the parameters are the same. Why does the compiler look at the parameters and not the member signature?

ICommunication' already defines a member called 'Receive' with the same parameter types.

How could I get around this?

I could rename Receive() as below but I'd prefer to keep it named Receive().

public interface ICommunication
{
    int Send(Dictionary<string, string> d);
    int Send(byte[] b);

    Dictionary<string, string> ReceiveDictionary();
    byte[] ReceiveBytes(); 
}
share|improve this question
3  
You aren't allowed to do this because the language designers decided that it would introduce too much ambiguity. You'll have to give them separate names. See here for discussion: stackoverflow.com/questions/442026/… –  Matthew Watson Oct 11 '13 at 10:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The return type is not part of the method signature, so from the language perspective the interface is declaring the same method twice.

From Microsoft's C# Programming Guide:

A return type of a method is not part of the signature of the method for the purposes of method overloading. However, it is part of the signature of the method when determining the compatibility between a delegate and the method that it points to.

share|improve this answer

What if you decided to code the following:

var x = Receive();

what method should it use? what is the return type?

share|improve this answer
    
But the language could have forced you to assign the return value to a specific type in order to disambiguate it. –  Matthew Watson Oct 11 '13 at 10:42
    
absolutely, but then implicit variable assignment for anonymous types would not exist which is quite a big feature if you use Linq etc –  Ric Oct 11 '13 at 10:43
    
That wouldn't affect anonymous types though, would it? Because a method name wouldn't come into it. Plus, this decision was made long before var was introduced. It was certainly technically possible for them to have designed the language to allow overloading on return types; but it's true that they didn't do that because of things such as your example. –  Matthew Watson Oct 11 '13 at 10:45
    
I agree with what you're saying, but lets say it was possible historically and then var was introduced or some other syntax for that matter that meant you didn't have to specify the type you wanted, then you would have a whole other issue on your hands. –  Ric Oct 11 '13 at 10:50

It is not allowed in C# because when you call it with Receive() how does System knows which Method to call?

Call returning Dictionary or byte array?

So Designers made it not supported

eg: var returnVal = ICommunication.Receive()

EDIT:

public interface ICommunication
{
    int Send(Dictionary<string, string> d);
    int Send(byte[] b);

   void Receive(out Dictionary<string, string>);
   void Receive(out byte[]); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
The language could have forced you to assign the return value to a specific type in order to disambiguate it. The question really is why wasn't the language designed in order to let you do this? –  Matthew Watson Oct 11 '13 at 10:43
    
@MatthewWatson Assign the return value???, It allows you to do in another way. See the EDIT in answer above. –  Rajesh Subramanian Oct 11 '13 at 10:44
    
I don't really consider solving it by overloading on parameter type a real solution. ;) By the way, note that IL itself does support overloading on return type. See blogs.msdn.com/b/abhinaba/archive/2005/10/07/478221.aspx –  Matthew Watson Oct 11 '13 at 10:51
    
+1 It's a solution that never occurred to me. I hate out parameters though! :) –  Sam Leach Oct 11 '13 at 20:01

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