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I have this code:

Long dval = new Long((new Date()).getTime());
System.out.println("ogval:"+dval);
Double dd = (double)dval;
System.out.println("dval:"+dd);

Here is the output:

ogval:1381490769636
dval:1.381490769636E12

When I convert the value to Double, it adds a decimal point. Can I do the typecasting and get the value in double as it is?

The desired output would be:

ogval:1381490769636
dval:1381490769636

I have a function whose argument accepts only double value. When I try to pass a timestamp, it passes the decimal value inside the method. I can't edit the function because its an inbuilt function of some package.

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2  
You need to format it using DecimalFormat class (docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/text/DecimalFormat.html) – Iván Pérez Oct 11 '13 at 10:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Simple answer is no.

Floating types can contain integer up to some arbitrary value, given by the way floats are stored. If the number is too big, it gets converted to decimal.

If you need to work with big integer values use BigInteger class.

Great tool to examine those imperfections is this float converter. Try 123456789 in the float converter, it won't be stored exactly.

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I have a function whose argument accepts only double value. When I try to pass a timestamp, it passes the decimal value inside the method. I cant edit the function because its an inbuilt function of some package. – aBhijit Oct 11 '13 at 10:45

Use DecimalFormat, like:

    Long dval = new Long((new Date()).getTime());
    System.out.println("ogval:" + dval);
    Double dd = (double) dval;
    DecimalFormat format=new DecimalFormat("##########");
    System.out.println("dval:" + format.format(dd));
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Decimal format doesn't help with precision. If the numbers are too big, the least significant digits will be lost, no matter the output format. – jnovacho Oct 11 '13 at 10:41

Your problem is not with the type that you are using, but with the format that you are applying to it. Currently, the default format is used, because string + double implicitly calls Double.toString, which converts your specific double to a String using scientific notation. You can force a different format if you wish by using printf or any other formatting method that Java makes available to you:

System.out.printf("dval: %12.0f", dd);

(demo)

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as an alternative you can try using bigdecimal

        Long dval = new Long((new Date()).getTime());
        System.out.println("ogval:"+dval);
        Double dd = (double)dval;
        System.out.println("dval:"+dd);
        BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal(dval);
        System.out.println("bdval:"+bd.toPlainString());
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