Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using lm, I would like to fit the model: y = b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b1*b2*x1*x2

My question is: How can I specify that the coefficient of the interaction should equal the multiplication of the coefficients the main effects?

I've seen that to set the coefficient to a specific value you can use offset() and I() but I don't know how to specify a relationship between coefficient.

Here is a simple simulated dataset:

n <- 50 # Sample size
x1 <- rnorm(n, 1:n, 0.5) # Independent variable 1
x2 <- rnorm(n, 1:n, 0.5) # Independent variable 2
b0 <- 1 
b1 <- 0.5
b2 <- 0.2
y <- b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b1*b2*x1*x2 + rnorm(n,0,0.1)

To fit Model 1: y = b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b3*x1*x2, I would use:

summary(lm(y~ x1 + x2 + x1:x2))

But how do I fit Model 2: y = b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b1*b2*x1*x2?

One of the main differences between the two models is the number of parameters to estimate. In Model 1, we estimate 4 parameters: b0 (intercept), b1 (slope of var. 1), b2 (slope of var. 2), and b3 (slope for the interaction between vars. 1 & 2). In Model 2, we estimate 3 parameters: b0 (intercept), b1 (slope of var. 1 & part of slope of the interaction between vars. 1 & 2), and b2 (slope of var. 2 & part of slope of the interaction between vars. 1 & 2)

The reason why I want to do this is that when investigating whether there is a significant interaction between x1 & x2, model 2, y = b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b1*b2*x1*x2, can be a better null model than y = b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2.

Many thanks!

Marie

share|improve this question
    
Search for linear regression with constraints. You will find many references in R. –  Ramnath Oct 11 '13 at 14:32
    
Ramnath, this is a nonlinear equality constraint -- linear inequality and equality constraints are easy, but this doesn't strike me as falling in that category? –  Ben Bolker Oct 11 '13 at 17:12
2  
I think the answers here are good. The only thing I have to add is that if you want to use nls() (because the estimates of the confidence intervals/p values are slightly more accurate than the delta method approach) but are having trouble finding decent starting values (because nls() can be finicky), you can use lm to estimate the parameters and put them into nls() as starting values. (I suggested this in an answer to another SO question which I can't seem to find right now.) –  Ben Bolker Oct 11 '13 at 20:07
    
You are right Ben. The constraint is nonlinear. Using lm parameters as a starting point for nls is a good strategy and I have used it successfully in the past. –  Ramnath Oct 12 '13 at 1:09
    
Do you actually want the b1 and b2 to simultaneously be best fit to the whole model, or do you just want the linear effects of b1 and b2 to be best fit but calculate the fit of your whole model to the data for model comparisons? –  John Oct 12 '13 at 2:36
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because of the constraint that you impose on the coefficients, the model you specify is not a linear model and so lm can not be used to fit it. You would need to use a non-linear regression, such as nls.

> summary(nls(y ~ b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b1*b2*x1*x2, start=list(b0=0, b1=1, b2=1)))

Formula: y ~ b0 + b1 * x1 + b2 * x2 + b1 * b2 * x1 * x2

Parameters:
   Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
b0 0.987203   0.049713   19.86   <2e-16 ***
b1 0.494438   0.007803   63.37   <2e-16 ***
b2 0.202396   0.003359   60.25   <2e-16 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1

Residual standard error: 0.1121 on 47 degrees of freedom

Number of iterations to convergence: 5 
Achieved convergence tolerance: 2.545e-06

You can really see that the model is non-linear when you re-write it as

> summary(nls(y ~ b0+(1+b1*x1)*(1+b2*x2)-1, start=list(b0=0, b1=1, b2=1)))

Formula: y ~ b0 + (1 + b1 * x1) * (1 + b2 * x2) - 1

Parameters:
   Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
b0 0.987203   0.049713   19.86   <2e-16 ***
b1 0.494438   0.007803   63.37   <2e-16 ***
b2 0.202396   0.003359   60.25   <2e-16 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1

Residual standard error: 0.1121 on 47 degrees of freedom

Number of iterations to convergence: 5 
Achieved convergence tolerance: 2.25e-06
share|improve this answer
add comment

There's no way to do what you're asking for in lm and there's no reason for it to be able to do it. You run lm to get estimates of of your coefficients. If you don't want to estimate the coefficient then don't include the predictor in the model. You can use coef to extract the coefficients you want and multiply them out afterwards.

Note that leaving the interaction out is a different model and will produce a different b1 and b2. You could alternatively leave I(x1 * x2) in and not use the coefficient.

As for why you want to do this, there's not good a priori justification that your constrained model actually fits better than the simple additive model. Having more free parameters necessarily means a model fits better but you haven't added that, you've added a constraint that, in the real world, could make it fit worse. In that case would you consider it a better "baseline" for comparison to the model including the interaction?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The reason why I want to do this is that when investigating whether there is a significant interactions between x1 & x2, model 2, y = b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b1*b2*x1*x2, can be a better null model than y = b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2. I wanted to know whether I could specify model 2 with lm. –  Marie Auger-Methe Oct 11 '13 at 13:17
    
@MarieAuger-Methe I don't quite understand your logic in thinking that that form is a better null model than the model just without an interaction term. But it seems like you could run that test just by fitting the full model without the constraint and then using the delta method to do the test you're interested in. –  Dason Oct 11 '13 at 18:21
add comment

Brian provides a way to fit the constrained model you specify but if you're interested in if the unconstrained model fits better than your constrained model you use the delta method to test that hypothesis.

# Let's make some fake data where the constrained model is true
n <- 100
b0 <- 2
b1 <- .2
b2 <- -1.3
b3 <- b1 * b2
sigma <- 1

x1 <- rnorm(n)
# make x1 and x2 correlated for giggles
x2 <- x1 + rnorm(n) 
# Generate data according to the model
y <- b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b3*x1*x2 + rnorm(n, 0, sigma)

# Fit full model y = b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x3 + b3*x1*x2 + error
o <- lm(y ~ x1 + x2 + x1:x2)

# If we want to do a hypothesis test of Ho: b3 = b1*b2
# this is the same as Ho: b3 - b1*b2 = 0
library(msm)
# Get estimate of the difference specified in the null
est <- unname(coef(o)["x1:x2"] - coef(o)["x1"] * coef(o)["x2"])
# Use the delta method to get a standard error for
# this difference
standerr <- deltamethod(~ x4 - x3*x2, coef(o), vcov(o))

# Calculate a test statistic.  We're relying on asymptotic
# arguments here so hopefully we have a decent sample size
z <- est/standerr
# Calculate p-value
pval <- 2 * pnorm(-abs(z))
pval

I explain what the delta method is used for and more on how to use it in R in this blog post.

Expanding on Brian's answer you could alternatively do this by comparing the full model to the constrained model - however you have to use nls to fit the full model to be able to easily compare the models.

o2 <- nls(y ~ b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b1*b2*x1*x2, start=list(b0=0, b1=1, b2=1))
o3 <- nls(y ~ b0 + b1*x1 + b2*x2 + b3*x1*x2, start = list(b0 = 0, b1 = 1, b2 = 1, b3 = 1))
anova(o2, o3)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.