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In Zed Shaw's Learn Ruby the Hard Way, exercise 21:

def add(a, b)
  puts "ADDING #{a} + #{b}"
  a + b
end

age = add(30, 5)  
puts "Age: #{age}"

This prints Age: 35.

I tried doing this with the previous exercise (ex20):

def print_all(f)
    puts f.read()
end

current_file = File.open(input_file)

sausage = print_all(current_file)

puts "Sausage: #{sausage}"

But when I run it, #{sausage} does not print, even after I move the file pointer back to 0:

def print_all(f)
    puts f.read()
end

def rewind(f)
  f.seek(0, IO::SEEK_SET)
end

current_file = File.open(input_file)

sausage = print_all(current_file)

rewind(current_file)

puts "Sausage: #{sausage}"

I assigned the return value from method add(a, b) to age, why can't I do the same with print_all(current_file)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
def print_all(f)
    puts f.read()
end

The return value of print_all is the return value of puts f.read(), which is the return value of puts, not the return value of f.read(). puts always returns nil. Therefore, print_all always returns nil.

Perhaps you intended:

def print_all(f)
    f.read()
end

Or if you need to print it in your function/method:

def print_all(f)
    foo = f.read()
    puts foo
    foo
end
share|improve this answer
    
Is it right to say that the 'return value' of def print_all(f) f.read() end Is the action of 'reading' the input_file? –  Isabella Chen Oct 22 '13 at 10:50
    
@user2835005, the return value isn't the "action" of reading, but it is the "result" of reading the input file. –  lurker Oct 22 '13 at 11:17

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