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I am looking for a simple API set of methods that find out if a folder is a subdirectory of another folder, and how many steps there are between this. Something like:

int numberOfFoldersDown(string parentFolder, string subfolder)  { ... }

It seems quite useful, though tedious to write, so I thought it should be somewhere in the System.IO.Path or System.IO.Directory assemblies, but I can't find any helpful methods there. Are these functions available, or should I write them myself?

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5  
I'm pretty sure you'll have to write that on your own. –  Michael Perrenoud Oct 11 '13 at 12:34
    
Good answer, though not quite the one I'd hoped for. ;-) Any suggestions on the approach? –  Yellow Oct 11 '13 at 12:58
    
Usefulness of such function (which seems have to work same way as String.IndexOf, but with the folders) is questionable. Normally pathes are saved (so application go directly into a folder) or iterated (so you don't know name yet). That's why it it is not exists. A side note (looking at answers), whenever you going to write this function: use as much of Path, File and Directory functionality as you can (to example, Path.GetFileName). Otherwise you are going to face lot of problems: UMC, ending backslash, not standard names, etc. –  Sinatr Oct 11 '13 at 13:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Nothing built-in AFAIK.

Here's some recursive example that uses both Path and Directory methods:

internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(NumberOfFoldersDown(@"c:\temp\", @"c:\temp\"));                   // 0
        Console.WriteLine(NumberOfFoldersDown(@"c:\temp\", @"c:\temp\zz\"));                // 1
        Console.WriteLine(NumberOfFoldersDown(@"c:\temp2\", @"c:\temp\zz\"));               // -1
        Console.WriteLine(NumberOfFoldersDown(@"c:\temp2\", @"c:\temp2\zz\hui\55\"));       // 3
        Console.WriteLine(NumberOfFoldersDown(@"c:\temp2\zz\", @"c:\temp2\zz\hui\55\"));    // 2

        Console.Read();
    }

    public static int NumberOfFoldersDown(string parentFolder, string subfolder)
    {
        int depth = 0;
        WalkTree(parentFolder, subfolder, ref depth);
        return depth;
    }

    public static void WalkTree(string parentFolder, string subfolder, ref int depth)
    {
        var parent = Directory.GetParent(subfolder);
        if (parent == null)
        {
            // Root directory and no match yet
            depth = -1;
        }
        else if (0 != string.Compare(Path.GetFullPath(parentFolder).TrimEnd('\\'), Path.GetFullPath(parent.FullName).TrimEnd('\\'), true))
        {
            // No match yet, continue recursion
            depth++;
            WalkTree(parentFolder, parent.FullName, ref depth);
        }
    }
}
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You could iterate through all folders, getting the path name and once you get a path name, loop through that string checking for each '/' and then count how many many / there are, so for example:

C:/Users/Program Files/

There are 3 / so there are 3 hops to the file/folder you want

Hopefully this is some helpful information to what you want.

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2  
First of all it's '\' not '/', second that's not really reliable. Because of UNC-Paths (\\share\bla -> 3 Folders), and what if the program adds backslashs after the folder ( e.g. C:\Test\ -> 2 Folders) –  Daniel Abou Chleih Oct 11 '13 at 12:42
    
'(\\share\bla' You could always make double slashes as 1 count and if you don't want to count the last backslash after a file, you can always ignore that, anyway this was kind of a rough idea on how it could work, never tried to do anything like this so just giving a method how I'd try it. –  user2811184 Oct 11 '13 at 12:47
    
It's a good start, but the slashes are a problem. Windows internally always uses forward slashes indeed, but another problem that may arise is scenarios like this: folder/../otherfolder. So as mentioned, this all gets very tedious, hence my hope to find an existing function that does this. –  Yellow Oct 11 '13 at 12:50

Find the path somehow, maybe by iterating them all.

When you found one split the path on backslash, put the parts in an array. reverse the array, iterate through that array checking if the foldername matches the parentfoldername string. if it does, return the index + 1 for the steps?

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as long as I know the only way to do it is

parent folder : Split the path on "\" and think to remove the drive letter and colon
subfolder     : navigate it recursively (which can be time consuming)

Many other point have to be considered in this but this is the big idea!

Edit : Ok here is a sample of what you need... more job to be done but it's a good start I think... The advantage is that you work with unknown folder structure and not just a string representing a path.

public static class FoldersHelper
{
    public static int ParentFolderCount(string path)
    {
        int parentcnt = 0;

        if (System.IO.Directory.Exists(path))
        {
            string pathroot = Path.GetPathRoot(path);
            path = path.Remove(1, pathroot.Length);
            parentcnt = path.Split('\\').Count()-1;
            return parentcnt;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new Exception("not a folder exception");
        }

        return 0;
    }

    public static int ChildFolderCount(string path)
    {
        int childcnt = 0;
        int maxchild = 0;

        if (System.IO.Directory.Exists(path))
        {
            if (Directory.GetDirectories(path).Length > 0)
            {
                foreach (string subpath in Directory.GetDirectories(path))
                {
                    childcnt = ChildFolderCount(subpath) + 1;
                    if (childcnt > maxchild) maxchild = childcnt;
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            throw new Exception("not a folder exception");
        }

        return maxchild;
    }

}
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