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What is the difference between the -> and ->> macros in Clojure?

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See Clojure docs. –  A. Webb Oct 11 '13 at 13:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 40 down vote accepted

The docs A. Webb linked to explain the "what", but don't do a good job of the "why".

As a rule, when a function works on a singular subject, that subject is the first argument (e.g., conj, assoc). When a function works on a sequence subject, that subject is the last argument (e.g., map, filter).

So, -> and ->> are documented as threading the first and last arguments respectively, but it is also useful to think of them as applying to singular or sequential arguments respectively.

For example, we can consider a vector as a singular object:

(-> [1 2 3]
  (conj 4)         ; (conj [1 2 3] 4)
  (conj 5)         ; (conj [1 2 3 4] 5)
  (assoc 0 0))     ; (assoc [1 2 3 4 5] 0 0)
=> [0 2 3 4 5]

Or we can consider it as a sequence:

(->> [1 2 3]   
  (map inc)        ; (map inc [1 2 3])
  (map inc)        ; (map inc (2 3 4))
  (concat [0 2]))  ; (concat [0 2] (3 4 5))
=> (0 2 3 4 5)
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14  
I tend to think of the distinction between Clojure functions which operate on their first vs. second argument as having more to do with whether they're higher order functions than if the argument is sequential. The first argument to conj or assoc is often sequential, as is the second argument to map or filter. However, map and filter are both higher order and take their functional argument as the first argument. So in this way of looking at it, ->> tends to be used for chaining higher order functions and -> otherwise. –  jbm Oct 11 '13 at 19:12
    
Your point about singular and sequential arguments makes great sense for me! I also see now, why I was confused about these macros. The issue was I looked at the functions with the only argument, f.e. (-> 42 str) and (->> 42 str) both return "42". But when I glance through the example above, thing are obvious for me. –  avli Oct 13 '13 at 7:18

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