Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In MySQL, I'm sick of adding the columns dt_created and dt_modified (which are date time stamps for creation and last modified respectively) to all the tables I have in my database.

Every time I INSERT or UPDATE the database, I will have to use the NOW() keyword. This is going all over my persistence.

Is there any efficient alternative where MySQL can automatically store at least the datatime of the row that is inserted and let me retrieve it?

share|improve this question
    
My poor grammar lurks on the dark depths of Stack Overflow. Thank you @Eric Leschinski. –  mauris Oct 29 '14 at 17:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 29 down vote accepted

You can use DEFAULT constraints to set the timestamp:

ALTER TABLE
 MODIFY dt_created datetime DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

ALTER TABLE
 MODIFY dt_modified datetime DEFAULT ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

Then you wouldn't have to specify NOW() in your INSERT/UPDATE statements.

Reference: TIMESTAMP properties

share|improve this answer
    
ahh I didn't know you can use something like ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP –  mauris Dec 19 '09 at 6:03
1  
Aditional info: One TIMESTAMP column in a table can have the current timestamp as the default value for initializing the column, as the auto-update value, or both. It is not possible to have the current timestamp be the default value for one column and the auto-update value for another column. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/timestamp-initialization.html –  alditis Oct 21 '13 at 0:02
ALTER TABLE  `tablename` CHANGE  `dt`  `dt` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

should be the correct code.

share|improve this answer

Well, you can't have both:

mysql doc:

It is not possible to have the current timestamp be the default value for one column and the auto-update value for another column.

Sad, isn't it?

You could however use null instead of now() following this tip

share|improve this answer

If you're using phpmyadmin you can do this by :

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Similar question was asked here "Timestamp for MySQL" the timestamp field will update every time it is accessed. You might also consider a Trigger placed on the table in question to automatically populate those fields for you. Depending on the environment some shops/businesses do not like the use of triggers and so you might have to find alternate work arounds.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.