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So I have run into a problem with my ABC design in C++. I'm going to use a simplified example from what I actually have. Please ignore any syntax errors until I get to where my issue is.

So I have an ABC:

class ABC  
{  
public:  
    virtual void DoSomething() = 0;  
};

Then I have a derived class:

class Derived: public ABC  
{  
public:  
    void DoSomething() { // something }  
};

In my main logic function I have something along the lines of:

ABC* obj = new Derived;
obj->DoSomething();

Now at this point my code works beautifully, I have multiple classes functioning correctly based on if I change the type (manually for now) from one derived class to another using the abstract base class as the type for the derived objects.

Now my issue...

If I want to change my derived class to add in functionality that is not supported by the ABC then my compiler is not recognizing them whatsoever. For example if I leave ABC the way it is and change Derived to:

class Derived: public ABC  
{  
public:  
    void DoSomething() { // something }  
    void DoSomethingElse() { // something else, not defined in ABC}  
};

Then back to my main logic function:

ABC* obj = new Derived;  
obj->DoSomething(); 
// Compiler does not recognize this, due to not being in the "ABC" class   
obj->DoSomethingElse();

My compiler keeps giving me errors that "DoSomethingElse()" is not a member of the ABC. Is what I am trying to do possible? It feels like I am overlooking something simple but I've hit this road block in my architecture of this piece of software. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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it smells a little bit like bad design (maybe this is because of your simplified example). Perhaps you could move DoSomethingElse() as empty virtual method to ABC and override it in Derived. This would remove you problem in this case (with a little performance overhead for the virt. function call) –  Tobias Langner Dec 19 '09 at 7:37
    
Well to kind of explain what I'm actually trying to accomplish, I am trying to architect a rendering engine that could support Direct3D 9 and 10 or potentially other rendering APIs. But the problem is that the API's differ in the data types for each one. For example a device pointer in D3D9 is the type IDirect3DDevice9, and in D3D10 it is ID3D10Device. So making a function called "GetDevice()" in the ABC is not so easily done in this case. –  Kyle Lauing Dec 19 '09 at 7:43
1  
@Kyle: you're creating wrapper classes, correct? How about creating a base ThreeDDevice class, inheriting wrapper classes from that for IDirect3DDevice9 and ID3D10Device? Then you can write a ThreeDDevice ABC::GetDevice() method. –  outis Dec 19 '09 at 7:55
    
@outis: Yes I am. That seems like a possible solution that won't completely destroy my architecture, I'll have to give something like that a try. Thanks. –  Kyle Lauing Dec 19 '09 at 7:59
    
I have some more general suggestions that I mentioned in my answer. I think you ought to look into design patterns and educate yourself on them. It will make you a better designer. –  Omnifarious Dec 19 '09 at 10:16

6 Answers 6

You are trying to invoke a method which only exists in the derived class, so you would need to cast the obj pointer like so to invoke this method:

Derived* derivedObj = dynamic_cast<Derived*>(obj);
derivedObj->DoSomethingElse();

Note that dynamic_cast will do a run-time check to ensure that obj is part of the same class hierarchy (i.e. it is a "valid" cast), and will return 0 if the cast is invalid. Note that you need to enable RTTI to use dynamic_cast.

Casting like this can be considered a code-smell, and there may be a better way to achieve what you are doing.

Polymorphism (what you are trying to achieve here) works better when you are using abstract base classes - i.e. when the methods are pure virtual in the base class, and implemented in any derived classes. This is analagous to interfaces in other languages.

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This is completely correct, the obj pointer you are using is of the ABC type, so according to the principle of Polymorphism, it will only have the methods available to the ABC class. This is, of course, completely correct and sensible if you think about it.

If you really need access to the special methods on the derived objects, you need a pointer of that type, as it wouldn't really BE that type until you do that.

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In my opinion you have a broken design. What you want to do can't be done.

Think about this... How does code that calls the function that returns the DirextX9 device type know that that function exists? What happens if it gets an ABC * that points at an instance of the DirectX10 functionality?

In my opinion, what you should do is figure out the major abstractions that exist in all versions of DirectX (which, being a Unix geek is an API with which I am wholly unfamiliar and think you ought to be using the cross-platform OpenGL instead). Then you create an interface for each abstraction and make it into an ABC. The interfaces for each ABC only mention other ABCs. Then you derive a specific class for each abstraction that implements it in terms of the types and functions of a specific version of the DirectX API.

Now, you might end up with something like this:

class Sprocket;

class Widget {
 public:
    virtual void squeak() = 0;
    virtual bool nudgeSprocket(Sprocket *sp);
};

class Sprocket {
 public:
    virtual void turn() = 0;
};

class GoldWidget {
 public:
    void squeak();
    bool nudgeSprocket(Sprocket *sp);
};

class GoldSprocket {
 public:
    void turn();
    virtual int glitter();
};

class SilverWidget {
 public:
    void squeak();
    bool nudgeSprocket(Sprocket *sp);
};

class SilverSprocket {
 public:
    void turn();
    virtual int shine();
};

Now, it may be that you only have machines made out of gold or silver but not both. And you might decide that GoldWidget::nudgeSprocket(Sprocket *sp) needs to be able to call GoldWidget::glitter() on its sp argument, and that this will be perfectly safe. In my (and may others) opinion, this is a design error.

One of two things should be true. Either the nudgeSprocket method should be implemented in terms of the generic Sprocket interface, or there should be a class that knows it is dealing with a GoldWidget and will call a version of nudgeSprocket that takes a GoldSprocket as an argument.

I would suggest reading about design patterns as I think knowing about this particular way of thinking about things will help you organize your thoughts about how to do this and result in a relatively clean design. In particular, I suspect the Adapter pattern, the Bridge pattern, and the Facade pattern used in some combination might work well for helping you solve your problem.

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DoSomethingElse is a member of Derived, not ABC, so the compiler can't assume you can call it on a pointer of type ABC. You could upcast to a Derived*, or change the ABC* to a Derived* since you know it's derived, or you could move DoSomethingElse to the Abstract class.

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Sadly with this design I cannot add DoSomethingElse() to the abstract class. If I just used Derived* obj = new Derived, it would work fine and it does, but it seems like a non elegant solution but possibly the only one. –  Kyle Lauing Dec 19 '09 at 7:34
1  
Well, not all Base can DoSomethingElse. Only Derived knows how to DoSomethingElse. So, if all your code has is a pointer to some Base, the only way to make it DoSomethingElse is to make sure it's Derived first (see the answer about dynamic_cast), and then do it. But the need to do so points at a weakness in your design (most likely). –  Pavel Minaev Dec 19 '09 at 7:53

Because base class object can't refer to something which is not part of it.

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It sounds like you want to use RTTI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run-time%5Ftype%5Finformation) - if the pointer happens to be a SubClassFoo, you have additional functionality you can use. If it doesn't, you might be out of luck on special functionality, but might be able to degrade gracefully.

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