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I have a table Stuff defined as...

id, <fields>..., active

Active is the soft-delete flag and is always 1 or 0. Long term this may go away in favor of a historical table.

public interface StuffRepository extends JpaRepository<StuffEntity, Long> {} 

In code we always was use active records. Is there a way to get Spring to always append an active=1 condition to queries generated for this repository? Or more ideally allow me to extend the grammar used to generate the queries?

I understand that I can created named @queues everywhere but then I lose the convenience of the generated queries. I also want to avoid polluting the interface with "active" methods.

I am using Hibernate 4.2 as my JPA implementation if that matters.

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3 Answers 3

In current versions (up to 1.4.1) there's no dedicated support for soft deletes in Spring Data JPA. However, I strongly encourage you to play with the feature branch for DATAJPA-307 as this is a feature currently worked on for the upcoming release.

To use the current state update the version you use to 1.5.0.DATAJPA-307-SNAPSHOT and make sure you let it pull in the special Spring Data Commons version it needs to work. You should be able to follow the sample test case we have to see how to get that stuff working.

P.S.: I'll update the question once we finished working on the feature.

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1  
Looking forward to it. You're doing awesome work there Oliver! –  Neil McGuigan Oct 15 '13 at 17:35
1  
Did this make it into release? –  Vineet Bhatia Aug 5 '14 at 19:50

This is an old question, and you probably already found the answer. BUT, for all the Spring/JPA/Hibernate programmers out there seeking for answer -

Say you have an entity Dog:

 @Entity
 public class Dog{

 ......(fields)....        

 @Column(name="is_active")
 private Boolean active;
 }

and a repository:

public interface DogRepository extends JpaRepository<Dog, Integer> {
} 

All you need to do is add the @Where annotation on the entity level, resulting:

@Entity
@Where(clause="is_active=1")
public class Dog{

......(fields)....        

@Column(name="is_active")
private Boolean active;
}

All the queries performed by the repository will automatically filter out the "non-active" rows.

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I believe this is a Hibernate centric answer. If you have some docs that show that @Where is a JPA or Spring feature, please share them. –  Andrew White Mar 6 '14 at 2:04
    
Yes, this is an Hibernate solution. I mentioned it in the answer first paragraph but apparently I wasn't 100% clear. So - this solution uses Hibernate's @Where annotation. Sorry, and thanks for the correction. BY THE WAY - the person who asked the question uses hibernate (4.2), which was the main reason for me to give an answer that complies to his needs. –  Shay Elkayam Mar 7 '14 at 7:26

I suggest you use a database view (or equivalent in Oracle) if you don't want to import hibernate specific annotations. In mySQL 5.5, these views can be updateable and insertable if the filter criteria is as simple as active=1

create or replace view active_stuff as select * from Stuff where active=1;

Whether this is a good idea probably depends on your database but it works great in my implementation.

Undeleting required an additional entity which accessed 'Stuff' directly but then so would @Where

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