Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table like the following which is basically used to "give a name" to a value in a table (this table contains values for a bunch of other tables as well, not just for MYTABLE; I've omitted a few irrelevant fields from NAMEVALUEMAP):

NAMEVALUEMAP Table
---------------------
VALUE_  | NAME_
---------------------
0       | ZERO
1       | ONE

I didn't want to use JOINs so I thought of using Sub-Queries.

Problem is when a value does not exist in the NAMEVALUEMAP table then NULL is shown.
Instead of NULL I want to show the actual value from MYTABLE (MYTABLE has ID field as identity column and contains a few rows):

-- //Fine, prints word 'ZERO' when MYTABLE.ABC is 0
SELECT 
(SELECT NAME_ FROM NAMEVALUEMAP WHERE VALUE_ = (SELECT ABC FROM MYTABLE inner_ WHERE inner_.ID = outer_.ID))
FROM 
MYTABLE outer_

-- //Not Fine, prints NULL (because "999" is not in NAMEVALUEMAP). In this case, MYTABLE.ABC is 999
-- //Want it to print 999 if the value is not in NAMEVALUEMAP
SELECT 
(SELECT NAME_ FROM NAMEVALUEMAP WHERE VALUE_ = (SELECT ABC FROM MYTABLE inner_ WHERE inner_.ID = outer_.ID))
FROM 
MYTABLE outer_

-- //Tried COALESCE, but the error is "Invalid column name 'VALUE_'"
SELECT 
COALESCE((SELECT NAME_ FROM NAMEVALUEMAP WHERE VALUE_ = (SELECT ABC FROM MYTABLE inner_ WHERE inner_.ID = outer_.ID)), ABC)
FROM 
MYTABLE outer_

Also, is there a better way to do this sort of value-to-name mapping?

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you want to use joins? –  Rich Dec 19 '09 at 9:05
    
Seems like I'm wrong about JOINs being slower than sub-queries, at least in this case? Please see my reply to comments below as to what my reasoning is.. –  Liao Dec 19 '09 at 9:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would recomend using a LEFT JOIN (is there any reason you are voidung it?) and ISNULL

SELECT  ISNULL(NAME_, ABC)
FROM    MYTABLE m LEFT JOIN
    NAMEVALUEMAP n ON m.ABC = n.VALUE_

Well, in that case you can try

SELECT  ISNULL((select NAME_ FROM NAMEVALUEMAP WHERE VALUE_ = m.ABC), m.ABC)
FROM    MYTABLE m
share|improve this answer
    
There are 3 such "MYTABLEs" I will be selecting about 20 columns from, each of those columns need this mapping. That would become quite a complicated (looking) query, plus (I'm not sure) I suppose sub-queries will be faster than JOINs? –  Liao Dec 19 '09 at 9:06
1  
No, joins will be faster than sub-queries. –  David M Dec 19 '09 at 9:07
    
Have a look at eggheadcafe.com/software/aspnet/32705705/join-vs-subquery.aspx In general there is no reason to assume that a subquery will be faster or slower than a join. Specific cases can point one way or the other, but there are too many variables for a general answer. –  Adriaan Stander Dec 19 '09 at 9:11
    
Perfect, Guruji. I shall be using the JOIN as it seems to have a better execution plan. Will come to know more in usage. Thanks! –  Liao Dec 19 '09 at 9:40

It is a left join, unless you want soem EXISTS/UNION construct. Not tested:

SELECT
    COALESCE(N.VALUE, M.ABC)
FROM
    MYTABLE M
    LEFT JOIN
    NAMEVALUEMAP N ON M.VALUE N.ABC

If you really want to avoid JOINs...

SELECT
    ABC
FROM
    MYTABLE M
WHERE
    NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM NAMEVALUEMAP N WHERE M.VALUE N.ABC)
UNION ALL
SELECT
    VALUE
FROM
    NAMEVALUEMAP N
WHERE
    EXISTS (SELECT * FROM MYTABLE M WHERE M.VALUE N.ABC)

Edit:

The SELECT *, 1 or NULL in EXISTS question again

share|improve this answer
    
I'm able to do this with JOINs but I want to avoid doing JOINs if I can. Please also see me reply to comment by astander on my reasoning for not using JOINs. I hope i'm right about that? –  Liao Dec 19 '09 at 9:07
    
select * can be a bit expensive for an exists in some DBMS, I would normally use select 1 instead –  Steve De Caux Dec 19 '09 at 9:09
1  
Database engines are designed to JOIN. A subquery will most likely generate more IO and a worse plan because it's a subquery for each column. One join = gets all columns. –  gbn Dec 19 '09 at 9:10
    
@Steve De Caux: it's not evaluated. Try EXISTS (SELECT 1/0...). It hasn't been evaluated on SQL Server since at least SQL Server 2000. –  gbn Dec 19 '09 at 9:17
    
@Steve De Caux: Mentioned in ANSI SQL 1992 Standard too, page 191 contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~shadow/sql/sql1992.txt –  gbn Dec 19 '09 at 9:18

EDIT:

SELECT 
COALESCE(
   (SELECT NAME_ FROM NAMEVALUEMAP WHERE VALUE_ = 
      (SELECT ABC FROM MYINNERTABLE inner_ WHERE inner_.ID = outer_.ID)
   ),
   <int to string>(
      SELECT ABC FROM MYINNERTABLE inner_ WHERE inner_.ID = outer_.ID
   )
)

FROM 
MYTABLE outer_

where column function <int to string> is appropriate for sqlserver. In mysql it would be CAST(). Without conversion, the query will throw a wobbly about the mismatched datatypes.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that would work for me - the value to be mapped to a name comes from a different table.. –  Liao Dec 19 '09 at 9:09
    
In your question you used the same table name (MYTABLE) for inner_ and outer_ => I assumed it was the same table. I've edited to accomodate your comment –  Steve De Caux Dec 19 '09 at 9:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.