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I am trying to initialize a base class and a subclass without having to copy the constructor. This is what I got:

tstbase.pm:

package tstbase;
use Exporter qw(import);
our @EXPORT = qw(&new);
my %config = (
    "class" => "tstbase",
);

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $self;
    $self->{"name"} = $config{"class"};
    bless ($self, $class);
    return $self;
};
1;

tstsubclass.pm:

package tstsubclass;
use tstbase;
my %config = (
  "class" => "tstsubclass",
);
1;

tst.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use tstsubclass;

my $baseobj = tstbase->new;
print "Testbase ".$baseobj->{"name"}."\n";
my $subobj = tstsubclass->new;
print "Testsubclass ".$subobj->{"name"}."\n";

The outout of tst.pl is

Testbase tstbase
Testsubclass tstbase

but I am looking for

Testbase tstbase
Testsubclass tstsubclass

which I get when I copy the "sub new { .. }" routine over to tstsubclass.pm. Is there a way to avoid that overhead? I have tried all combinations of my %config / our %config and exporting %config with no success.

Any help is greatly appreciated

Best, Marcus

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your constructor is inherited, so that's working fine. What's not working is your use of %config, which exists separately in each package. Because you're calling the constructor defined in your base class, that version of %config is used. In your specific case, the config hash is unnecessary, since you can just initialize the name member by using the $class variable passed in to your constructor:

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $self = { };     # initialize the object as a reference to an empty hash
    $self->{"name"} = $class;
    bless ($self, $class);
    return $self;
};

This will work (although it's unnecessary; you can always get the class of an object using Scalar::Util::blessed).

But the more general question appears to be about how to use class-specific configuration information in an inherited constructor. One way to do it would be to use a separate initialization step which can be overridden in the child class.

package tstbase;

# we don't use Exporter for OO code; exporting methods is highly counterproductive.
# we should also turn on strict and warnings.
use strict;
use warnings;

my %config = (
    "class" => "tstbase",
);

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $self;
    bless $self, $class;
    $self->_init( %config );
    return $self;
};

sub _init { 
    my $self = shift;
    my %args = @_;
    $self->{name} = $args{class};
}

1;

And then:

package tstsubclass;
use parent 'tstbase';   # we have to say what class we're extending

my %config = (
  "class" => "tstsubclass",
);

sub _init { 
    my $self = shift;
    $self->SUPER::_init( %config );
}

1;

In this case, your subclass's _init method will get called by the constructor in the parent class, which calls the parent class's _init method, but passing in its local %config.

An easier way to handle this would be to use mixins, or Moose roles.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick response! As you were probably suspecting, my goal was not to be able to access the class name, but rather perform some complex initialization of the class attributes - I just posted the stripped-down example. The original class constructor has 80 lines of code. I will check if that approach will solve my issue. In any case, you solved the question, so thumbs up for that! – Marcus Oct 11 '13 at 19:07

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