Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm fairly new to programming and I'm trying to see if it's possible to write a method that checks a parent class's to find it's type and then executes the same block of code for either outcome. Basically I'm just trying to see if there is a way of avoiding long if, else if statements when there are multiple different child classes.

e.g. instead of

public Class Shape
public Class Circle : Shape
public Class Rectangle : Shape
public Class Polygon : Shape
....

Shape shape;

if(shape.GetType() == typeof(Rectangle))
{
    var asRectangle = (Rectangle)shape;
    doSomething();
}
else if (shape.GetType() == typeof(Circle))
{
    var asCircle = (Circle)shape;
    doSameSomething();
}
else if (shape.GetType() == typeof(Polygon))
{
    var asPoly = (Polygon)shape;
    doSame();
}

Do something like:

if (shape.GetType() == typeof(Rectangle)) var someShape = (Rectangle)shape;
else if (shape.GetType() == typeof(Circle)) var someShape = (Circle)shape;
else if (shape.GetType() == typeof(Polygon)) var someShape = (Polygon)shape;

method(someShape)
{
    doStuff...
}

I know that you can't declare var like above, nor can you just do:

var dd;
if(something) var = whatever;

But I'm wondering if there is anyway of reusing the method without having to write if, else if, else if, else if statements every time I need to do something with shape.

share|improve this question
3  
Declare a method in your base class as virtual or abstract and you can declare it again in the derived class with the override keyword. This allows you to treat the object as a Shape and call a common function but have it call the appropriate method depending on which class the instance actually is. –  Trevor Elliott Oct 11 '13 at 18:20
add comment

3 Answers 3

Declare a method in your base class as virtual or abstract and you can declare it again in the derived class with the override keyword. This allows you to treat the object as a Shape and call a common function but have it call the appropriate method depending on which class the instance actually is.

public abstract class Shape
{
    public abstract void SayMyName();
}

public class Circle : Shape
{
    public override void SayMyName()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("I'm a circle!");
    }
}

public class Rectangle : Shape
{
    public override void SayMyName()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("I'm a rectangle!");
    }
}

public class Polygon : Shape
{
    public override void SayMyName()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("I'm a polygon!");
    }
}

Then you can consume it like this:

List<Shape> shapes = new List<Shape>(new Shape[]
{
    new Circle(),
    new Rectangle(),
    new Polygon(),
});

foreach (Shape s in shapes)
    s.SayMyName();
share|improve this answer
add comment

Typically, you would move the method into the Shape class, and just call it. If the method is virtual (or abstract), then the actual version in the derived type will be called.

This allows you to potentially provide a default implementation within Shape, and override it within Rectangle, Circle, Polygon, etc as needed for customizations.

For details, see Virtual Methods on MSDN.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome thanks. I originally had the Shape class virtual with some abstract properties, but I found myself with like 8 different references to the same Point, e.g. Shape.A, Shape.ListofPoints[0], Circle.A, Circle.ListofPoints[0], shapeAsCircle.A, etc... and I found myself getting lost trying to remember which reference I had used, so I was trying to reduce the references by not making them visible from Shape and just the child classes. –  karma deeds Oct 11 '13 at 18:38
    
@karmadeeds That's often working against yourself. It's better to have the things that are shared on the base class, so using the properties and methods becomes simpler. –  Reed Copsey Oct 11 '13 at 18:40
    
Thanks. I started my first "hello word" application with no previous knowledge of programming and I'm trying to teach myself, but I find that learning how to write code that does what I want it to do, is much easier than learning how to write code most effectively. So I really appreciate tips like this. –  karma deeds Oct 11 '13 at 18:44
add comment

Program against the interface, not the implementation.

That is, you should write your code to be performing actions (primarily) against the Shape base class/interface, instead of against the specific classes themselves. In other words, you shouldn't cast by default, but rather only as necessary. So if you implement your Shape class as an interface, like so:

abstract class Shape {
     public abstract Method() { ...}
}

then you don't need to cast at all, just call shape.Method() and it will work for all derived classes.

Also it's easier to do this:

if (shape is Polygon)

than calling shape.GetType().

share|improve this answer
    
Class has to be abstract too, else it won't compile –  Sriram Sakthivel Oct 11 '13 at 18:26
    
Thanks. I'm trying to teach myself how to write code and it's understanding things like this that I'm finding difficult to learn. At this point I'm happy that my code works at all, but I need to learn how I should be writing code rather than just finding anyway to make my idea work. –  karma deeds Oct 11 '13 at 18:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.