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I have a range partitioned table in oracle, it is possible to change that table to hash partition without dropping partition and recreating? Please suggest commands or good link for this one.

Also I like to know if we can use range partition table to create another table in database but using another partition option. below is the example I am referring to:

create table t2 
hash partition clause
as select * from t1;

Here t1 is a range partitioned table and t2 will be new table with hash partition. is this work in oracle?

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1 Answer 1

Creating a new table is the only real option here. You can do online redefinition, or expdp/imdp, but ultimately it comes down to

  • creating a new table and
  • moving the data and
  • getting the right privileges on it and
  • adding indexes.

The rest is just ways of avoiding issues like application downtime or lack of space in the database.

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Thank you for the suggestions and quick repsonse. Do you think query mentioned in my question will work or should I undo partition first and redo with hash? –  Amit Arora Oct 11 '13 at 18:33
    
I don't understand "should I undo partition first and redo with hash" –  David Aldridge Oct 11 '13 at 18:34
    
I have one table which is range partitioned now. I like to try hash partition on the same table. I am looking for the quick and easy way to change the partition range partition to hash. I do not have any backup etc for this table. It is big table 3 billion rows and I am looking for a way which will take smallest time. –  Amit Arora Oct 11 '13 at 18:37
    
I would use a nologging direct path insert with any required indexes already defined on the table. Apply parallel query if possible –  David Aldridge Oct 11 '13 at 18:42

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