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I am trying to access a local function variable outside the function in Python. So, for example,

bye = ''
def hi():
    global bye
    something
    something
    bye = 5
    sigh = 10

hi()
print bye

The above works fine as it should. Since I want to find out if I can access bye outside hi() without using global bye, I tried:

def hi():
    something
    something
    bye = 5 
    sigh = 10
    return

hi()
x = hi()
print x.bye 

The above gives AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'bye'.

Then, I tried:

def hi():
    something
    something
    bye = 5
    sigh = 10
    return bye 
hi()
x = hi()
print x.bye

This time it doesn't give even an error.

So, is there a way to access a local function variable (bye) outside its function (hi()) without using globals and without printing out variable sigh as well? (Question was edited to include sigh after @hcwhsa 's comment below.

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4  
bye = hi();print bye –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 11 '13 at 19:45
    
What are you trying to achieve? What is the use case? –  Rod Oct 11 '13 at 19:50
    
Thanks @hcwhsa ! This works. A follow-up question. Suppose the function defines more than 1 variable but I want to print just the bye variable. This solution, however, would print both. I'll edit my question accordingly. –  user2480526 Oct 11 '13 at 19:53
    
@Rod - My use case involves using the local variable outside the function. At the same time, the function has multiple variables and so, I have included the sigh variable. –  user2480526 Oct 11 '13 at 20:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could do something along this lines:

def hi():
#    something
#    something
    hi.bye = 5
    sigh = 10

hi()
print hi.bye

Functions are objects in Python and can have arbitrary attributes assigned to them.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This works beautifully. –  user2480526 Oct 11 '13 at 21:59
    
You're welcome, but I must add that this practice is fairly unusual. may be hard to debug, and makes the code hard to maintain -- because essentially it's the same thing as using global variables, and which have long been considered harmful. –  martineau Oct 12 '13 at 2:11

The problem is you were calling print x.bye after you set x as a string. When you run x = hi() it runs hi() and sets the value of x to 5 (the value of bye; it does NOT set the value of x as a reference to the bye variable itself). EX: bye = 5; x = bye; bye = 4; print x; prints 5, not 4

Also, you don't have to run hi() twice, just run x = hi(), not hi();x=hi() (the way you had it it was running hi(), not doing anything with the resulting value of 5, and then rerunning the same hi() and saving the value of 5 to the x variable.

So full code should be

def hi():
    something
    something
    bye = 5
    return bye 
x = hi()
print x

If you wanted to return multiple variables, one option would be to use a list, or dictionary, depending on what you need.

ex:

def hi():
    something
    xyz = { 'bye': 7, 'foobar': 8}
    return xyz
x = hi()
print x['bye']

more on python dictionaries at http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/datastructures.html#dictionaries

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is helpful. Though I can't shake the feeling that there is a clean/documented trick to achieve it - to define multiple local variables and then call just one of them outside the function. –  user2480526 Oct 11 '13 at 21:42

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