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Given a multiline string with some blank lines, how can I iterate over lines in Lua including the blank lines?

local s = "foo\nbar\n\njim"
for line in magiclines(s) do
  print( line=="" and "(blank)" or line)
end
--> foo
--> bar
--> (blank)
--> jim

This code does not include blank lines:

for line in string.gmatch(s,'[^\r\n]+') do print(line) end
--> foo
--> bar
--> jim

This code includes extra spurious blank lines:

for line in string.gmatch(s,"[^\r\n]*") do
  print( line=="" and "(blank)" or line)
end
--> foo
--> (blank)
--> bar
--> (blank)
--> (blank)
--> jim
--> (blank)
share|improve this question
1  
Matching \r these days is a mere formality, imho. –  hjpotter92 Oct 11 '13 at 20:14
    
for line in (s..'\n'):gmatch'(.-)\r?\n' do ... end –  Egor Skriptunoff Oct 11 '13 at 20:14
    
@hjpotter92 sometimes this char arrives and messes everything up... for example, some console applications may give a surprise: stackoverflow.com/a/17513439/1418097 –  Sarge Borsch Oct 11 '13 at 20:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

function magiclines(s)
        if s:sub(-1)~="\n" then s=s.."\n" end
        return s:gmatch("(.-)\n")
end
share|improve this answer
    
Elegant and an iterator. Spot on. –  Phrogz Oct 12 '13 at 16:46

Here’s a solution utilizing LPEG:

local lpeg      = require "lpeg"
local lpegmatch = lpeg.match
local P, C      = lpeg.P, lpeg.C

local iterlines
do
  local eol  = P"\r\n" + P"\n\r" + P"\n" + P"\r"
  local line = (1 - eol)^0
  iterlines = function (str, f)
    local lines = ((line / f) * eol)^0 * (line / f)
    return lpegmatch (lines, str)
  end
end

What you get is a function that can be used in place of an iterator. Its first argument is the string you want to iterate, the second is the action for each match:

--- print each line
iterlines ("foo\nbar\n\njim\n\r\r\nbaz\rfoo\n\nbuzz\n\n\n\n", print)

--- count lines while printf
local n = 0
iterlines ("foo\nbar\nbaz", function (line)
  n = n + 1
  io.write (string.format ("[%2d][%s]\n", n, line))
end)
share|improve this answer
    
Of course it can match (and capture) an empty string –  dualed Oct 12 '13 at 12:18
    
@dualed That was ambiguous, I removed the sentence. I was referring to the “loop body may accept empty string” error. Would it be possible to rewrite the pattern so that it accepts empty lines without that workaround? –  phg Oct 12 '13 at 12:31
    
I've come across that error, but I'm not really sure what you did there as a workaround, you'll have to actually "capture" it though, otherwise I think lpeg will discard it -- see my solution :) –  dualed Oct 12 '13 at 12:40
    
@dualed When analyzing your solution it made click, now the workaround is gone. Thanks! –  phg Oct 12 '13 at 12:50
    
I see what you did there. I was looking and looking for the C() capture, but of course it must work with the function capture too... –  dualed Oct 12 '13 at 13:45

Here is another lPeg solution because it seems I was writing it at the same time as phg. But since grammars are prettier, I'll still give it to you!

local lpeg = require "lpeg"
local C, V, P = lpeg.C, lpeg.V, lpeg.P

local g = P({ "S",
    S = (C(V("C")^0) * V("N"))^0 * C(V("C")^0),
    C = 1 - V("N"),
    N = P("\r\n") + "\n\r" + "\n" + "\r",
})

Use it like this:

local test = "Foo\n\nBar\rfoo\r\n\n\n\rbar"
for k,v in pairs({g:match(test)}) do
    print(">", v);
end

Or just print(g:match(test)) of course

share|improve this answer
    
I like that solution ;-) But I think the first rule should read S = (C(V("C")^0) * V("N"))^0 * C(V("C")^0), in order for it to accept single lines without a newline char. Btw. you don’t really need a grammar for this. –  phg Oct 12 '13 at 12:46
    
Yes, I think you are right about the first line. And of course you don't "need" a grammar, but I think its ... well more convenient to write and read - at least if you're used to reading formal syntax definitions. In any case a "grammar" in lPeg is only syntactic sugar for writing the same thing with local (or even global) variables. –  dualed Oct 12 '13 at 13:35

The following pattern should match each line including blank lines with one caveat: the string must contain a terminating CR or LF.

local s = "foo\nbar\n\njim\n" -- added terminating \n

for line in s:gmatch("([^\r\n]*)[\r\n]") do
   print(line == "" and "(blank)" or line)
end

--> foo
--> bar
--> (blank)
--> jim

An alternate pattern that does not require a trailing CR or LF will produce a blank line as the last line (since is it acceptable to capture nothing).

local s = "foo\nbar\n\njim"

for line in s:gmatch("([^\r\n]*)[\r\n]?") do
   print(line == "" and "(blank)" or line)
end

--> foo
--> bar
--> (blank)
--> jim
--> (blank)
share|improve this answer

See if this magiclines implementation suits your bill:

local function magiclines( str )
    local pos = 1;
    return function()
        if not pos then return nil end
        local  p1, p2 = string.find( str, "\r?\n", pos )
        local line
        if p1 then
            line = str:sub( pos, p1 - 1 )
            pos = p2 + 1
        else
            line = str:sub( pos )
            pos = nil
        end
        return line
    end
end

You can test it with the following code:

local text = [[
foo
bar

jim

woof
]]


for line in magiclines( text ) do
    print( line=="" and "(blank)" or line)
end

Output:

foo
bar
(blank)
jim
(blank)
woof
(blank)
share|improve this answer

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