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I am a TA for a java class at my university and a student confronted me with a very odd problem today in lab. I looked over it for about an hour and had the other TA in lab do the same, yet we could not find a problem.

Effectively what we are doing here is creating 3 arrays, passing them into a new method. Modifying the value of those array in the new method and returning back to the original method. We are not using the return statement to return any of the arrays to the original method. Instead we are levering, what I can only describe being from a C background as pass-by-reference. However upon returning to the original method that values have changed to some incorrect values.

In this specific example we have three arrays called: "exams", "quizzes" and "labs." Each of these arrays are of size 1,000 and are initialized to -1. Inside the first method "calcGrade" we create these arrays and initialize them. Then we pass all three arrays to the second method which captures the amount of exams, quizzes and labs the user has and then stores the actual exam, quiz and lab grade values to the arrays.

METHOD 1 (calcGrade)

exams            quizzes           labs
 -1                 -1              -1
 -1                 -1              -1
 -1                 -1              -1
 -1                 -1              -1
  .                  .               .
  .                  .               .
  .                  .               .

METHOD 2 (getScores)

exams            quizzes           labs
 90                 80             90
-1                  80             90
-1                 -1              -1
-1                 -1              -1
 .                  .               .
 .                  .               .
 .                  .               .

BACK to METHOD 1 (calcGrades)

exams            quizzes           labs
80                 90              90
-1                 -1              90
-1                 -1              -1
-1                 -1              -1
 .                  .               .
 .                  .               .
 .                  .               .

Can anyone think of any reason this could be happening? I am honestly stumped and I don't want him to lose credit for something that doesn't seem to be wrong...

Here is the code (please note that there are several println statements in there for debugging purposes):

    import java.util.Scanner;

 public class CSE1341Grade{

    public static void main(String [] args){
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        System.out.println("What is your first name?  ");
        String first = input.nextLine();
        System.out.println("What is your last name?  ");
        String last = input.nextLine();

        calcGrade(first, last);

    }
    public static void calcGrade(String first, String last){

        int base = 1000;
        int[] quizzes = new int [base];
        int[] exams = new int [base];
        int[] labs = new int [base];
        for(int x = 0; x < base; x++)
        {
            quizzes[x] = -1;
            exams[x] = -1;
            labs[x] = -1;
        }

        int[] countarr = getScores(quizzes, exams, labs);
        System.out.println("EXAMS:");
        for(int x = 0; x < countarr[0]; x++)
            System.out.println(exams[x]);

        System.out.println("QUIZ:");
        for(int x = 0; x < countarr[1]; x++)
            System.out.println(quizzes[x]);

        System.out.println("LABS:");
        for(int x = 0; x < countarr[2]; x++)
            System.out.println(labs[x]);

        for(int x = 0; x < countarr.length; x++)
            System.out.println(countarr[x]);
        //System.out.println("----");
        double examAvg =0.0;
        for(int i=0;i<countarr[0];i++){            //adding together scores
            examAvg+=exams[i];
            //System.out.println(examAvg);
        }
        //System.out.println("----");
        double quizAvg=0.0;
        for(int i=0;i<countarr[1];i++){            //adding together scores
            quizAvg+=quizzes[i];
            //System.out.println(quizAvg);
        }
        //System.out.println("----");
        double labAvg=0.0;
        for(int i=0;i<countarr[2];i++){                  //adding together scores
            labAvg+=labs[i];
            //System.out.println(labAvg);
        }

        examAvg = examAvg/countarr[0];

        quizAvg = quizAvg/countarr[1];

        labAvg = labAvg/countarr[2];

        double totalAverage = (.5 * examAvg) + (.35 * quizAvg) + (.1 *labAvg) + 5.0;

        System.out.println("Total Score: " +totalAverage);//display average

        String grade = "";

        if (totalAverage >= 90)
            grade = "A";
        else if (totalAverage >= 80)
            grade ="B";
        else if (totalAverage >= 70)
            grade = "C";
        else
            grade = "F";

        System.out.println(first + " " + last + " your grade is a: " + grade); //letter grade

    }
    public static int [] getScores(int [] exams, int [] quizzes, int [] labs){
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        int [] countArray = new int[3];             //holding numbers of exams quizzes labs

        System.out.println("How many exam grades do you have? ");
        countArray[0] = input.nextInt(); 
        System.out.println("How many quiz grades do you have? ");
        countArray[1] = input.nextInt();
        System.out.println("How many lab grades do you have?" );
        countArray[2] = input.nextInt();

        System.out.println(countArray[0] + ", " + countArray[1] + ", " + countArray[2]);

        for(int counter = 0; counter < countArray[0]; counter++){  //every exam score
            System.out.printf("Enter Exam" + " " + (counter + 1) + " " + "score: ");
            exams[counter]=input.nextInt();
            System.out.println(exams[counter]);
        }
        System.out.println("----");

        for(int counter = 0; counter < countArray[1]; counter++){  //every quiz score
            System.out.printf("Enter Quiz" + " " + (counter + 1) + " " + "score: ");
            quizzes[counter]=input.nextInt();
            System.out.println(quizzes[counter]);
            }
        System.out.println("----");

        for(int counter = 0; counter < countArray[2]; counter++){  //every lab score
            System.out.printf("Enter Lab" + " " + (counter + 1) + " " + "score: ");
            labs[counter]=input.nextInt();
            System.out.println(labs[counter]);
        }
        System.out.println("----");

        System.out.println("EXAMS:");
        for(int x = 0; x < countArray[0]; x++)
            System.out.println(exams[x]);

        System.out.println("QUIZ:");
        for(int x = 0; x < countArray[1]; x++)
            System.out.println(quizzes[x]);

        System.out.println("LABS:");
        for(int x = 0; x < countArray[2]; x++)
            System.out.println(labs[x]);

        System.out.println("************************");

        return countArray;                    //return back to calc grade
    }
    }
share|improve this question
2  
Please boil down the code to the simplest possible state that still produces the same problem. Doing so will 1) make it easier for us to help you and 2) perhaps let you spot the problem yourself. –  arshajii Oct 11 '13 at 20:22
    
Also it's a common misconception that Java objects are passed by reference. They're actually passed by value of the reference, which is not the same. –  arshajii Oct 11 '13 at 20:23
    
@arshajii - What's the difference between "pass by reference" and "pass by value of the reference"? They both pass the address of the object. The confusion is in thinking that non-primitive Java variables and fields are objects when they are never more than references to objects. –  Ted Hopp Oct 11 '13 at 21:07
    
@TedHopp They are different. If Java was truly pass by reference when it came to objects, then we could reassign an object parameter and the reassignment would show up in whatever variable we passed to the function. This is not the case in Java. A reference is still passed because we can mutate the object and the change persists, this is what we mean by value of the reference. This is described in more detail here: stackoverflow.com/questions/40480/is-java-pass-by-reference. –  arshajii Oct 11 '13 at 22:50
    
@arshajii - Java is strictly call by value. However, when you declare something like String x = "hello";, then the value of x is not the String object, but a reference to it. The object itself is, in fact, passed by reference because the value of x is the reference to the object. What it does not do is pass a reference to the variable (that itself is just a reference to the object), which is why you can't change a variable in the calling code by passing it to a method. I guess that my main point is simply that "pass by value of the reference" is not standard terminology. –  Ted Hopp Oct 13 '13 at 0:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You swapped the arguments in the call. Type checking can't save you here.

That is, when you call a function

public static int [] getScores(int [] exams, int [] quizzes, int [] labs) {...}

with

int[] countarr = getScores(quizzes, exams, labs);

you can't expect the results to make any sense!

share|improve this answer
1  
Good eye! What could save OP would be to define a class that had the quizzes/exams/labs as fields. –  Ted Hopp Oct 11 '13 at 20:23
2  
@TedHopp Then he could trip up on the constructor call :) –  Marko Topolnik Oct 11 '13 at 20:24
1  
Exactly. This is THE main use case for named method/function parameters in programming languages –  Judge Mental Oct 11 '13 at 20:25
1  
@MarkoTopolnik - Heh. The idea, though, would be to never pass separate arrays anywhere, including into a constructor. –  Ted Hopp Oct 11 '13 at 20:25
    
@TedHopp Or any same-typed objects. For example, a single array of objects representing the triple (exam,quiz,lab) is just as slippery. What could save him here is to avoid positional arguments. For example, pass a map String->array, use a custom class with a builder pattern, etc. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 11 '13 at 20:27

There's a mismatch between the signature and what arguments you're calling it with.

int[] countarr = getScores(quizzes, exams, labs);

public static int [] getScores(int [] exams, int [] quizzes, int [] labs){

You've apparently mixed up the arguments

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