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So I have a really frustrating build error I have been staring at for the past hour or two. It involves one of my functions in my linked list program. It thinks I have statements outside the function when they are clearly inside, and thinks the { : } ratio is off. Am I missing something really simple?

// Index returns the location of element e. If e is not present,
// return 0 and false; otherwise return the location and true.
func (list *linkedList) Index(e AnyType) (int, bool) {
        var index int = 0
        var contain bool = false
        if list.Contains(e) == false {
            return 0, false
        }
        for int i := 0; i < list.count; i++ {    \\175
            list.setCursor(i)
            if list.cursorPtr.item == e {
                index = list.cursorIdx
                contain = true
            }
        }
        return index, contain    \\182
}    \\183

Build errors

./lists.go:175: syntax error: unexpected name, expecting {
./lists.go:182: non-declaration statement outside function body
./lists.go:183: syntax error: unexpected }

I appreciate any help. Thank you.

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After you accepted the answer below, please consider accepting answers in other questions as well if they solved your problem. –  nemo Oct 11 '13 at 22:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Looks like it's all line 175's fault, should be

for i := 0; i < list.count; i++ {

note I removed int

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Ahh thank you so much! := declares 'i' as an int already, so that was redundant. Thanks so much. –  user1945077 Oct 11 '13 at 22:42
    
If you do want to declare types explicitly, the type goes after the variable in Go: play.golang.org/p/HPE35kl7ep –  MatrixFrog Oct 12 '13 at 20:10

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