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In F#, we can create a function like this:

let ``add x and y`` x y = x + y

And I can call it normally like this:

``add x and y`` 1 2

Is there a way to call the function above from C# side? I couldn't even see it in Object Browser though.

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Reflection? That might be the only way. –  p.s.w.g Oct 11 '13 at 21:31
    
Thanks. I was thinking about that, but it will make code harder to read. I think I could just re-bind the function with C#-friendly name instead. –  kimsk Oct 11 '13 at 21:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can expose any valid F# function name to C# as any C# valid function name using CompiledName attribute:

namespace Library1
module Test = 
    [<CompiledName("Whatever")>]
    let ``add a and b`` x y = x + y

and then in C#:

 using Library1;
 ...............
 System.Console.WriteLine(Test.Whatever(2,2));
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Ah, I knew there was some attribute out there that did this. –  Jeff Mercado Oct 12 '13 at 1:46

Reflection might be the only way, but it doesn't have to be ugly to use. Just wrap it all within a class to do the reflecting.

public static class MyModuleWrapper
{
    // it would be easier to create a delegate once and reuse it
    private static Lazy<Func<int, int, int>> addXAndY = new Lazy<Func<int, int, int>>(() =>
        (Func<int, int, int>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<int, int, int>), typeof(MyModule).GetMethod("add x and y"))
    );
    public static int AddXAndY(int x, int y)
    {
        return addXAndY.Value(x, y);
    }

    // pass other methods through.
    public static int OtherMethod(int x, int y)
    {
        return MyModule.OtherMethod(x, y);
    }
}

Then use it like normal.

var sum = MyModuleWrapper.AddXAndY(1, 2);
var otherValue = MyModuleWrapper.OtherMethod(1, 2); // use the wrapper instead

I'm not sure what needs to be changed or how if there are polymorphic types involved, but hopefully you get the idea and can apply the necessary changes.

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