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I'm starting off a new web project and I'm wondering whether to use em or px for the layout and font sizes.

Despite the fact that most browsers now support text and image zooming regardless of whether fonts are defined in px or em, the community support for using em is still strong.

But there are 2 problems I see with using em.

First is the problem with large and wide monitors - often this results in text running miles and miles across the screen, which is very difficult to read as you read down the page.

Secondly, what if your site needed to integrate a Flash component? If you want the Flash component to fit exactly inside a div (e.g the main container of the site) that is defined in em, how would you go about it since Flash components are measured in px?

Is there a compelling reason to use EM over PX, really?

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closed as not constructive by Linger, Mario, Brian Mains, Max MacLeod, François Wahl Dec 21 '12 at 14:59

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possible duplicate of Why em instead of px? –  Mario Dec 21 '12 at 14:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

First is the problem with large and wide monitors - often this results in text running miles and miles across the screen, which is very difficult to read as you read down the page.

Using em or px, you can still define a width (or max-width) to your layout.

Secondly, what if your site needed to integrate a Flash component? If you want the Flash component to fit exactly inside a div (e.g the main container of the site) that is defined in em, how would you go about it since Flash components are measured in px?

To fit exactly, you can still use 100% width, or maybe I did not understand your point.


In theory, using em instead of px will allow your layout to be easily sizable based on user preferences.

But today, modern browsers can resize px layouts as well as em layouts so it might not be as relevant as it was some years ago.

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Good answer, I don't think I could explain it better myself. –  Philip Morton Dec 19 '09 at 22:26
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cleared things up :-) thanks –  helloworlder Dec 20 '09 at 5:55
    
Regarding the dimensions of the Flash component, he was probably referring to the dimensions of the container that would hold it, as some Flash elements may not scale well. –  JGarrido May 5 '10 at 14:50

When you use relatively sized instead of fixed fonts, then the major benefit is that a (optically disabled) visitor can zoom in/out the webpage including the fonts. It's all about web accessibility.

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That's not really as much of an issue these days. All major browsers these days, Internet Explorer included, will zoom the entire page, fonts included. –  Turnor Dec 19 '09 at 12:25
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But that's not the case anymore for most browsers. I'm just not sure if it's worth the effort to cater to the remaining IE6 users. –  helloworlder Dec 19 '09 at 12:25
    
I've always wounder what type of zoom that would be, if i zoom in using cmd + mousewheel_up on px based sides it scales perfectly nice. in firefox –  antpaw Dec 19 '09 at 12:29
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It is true that the newer browsers supports zooming on fixed fonts, but you don't want to be dependent on the webbrowser whether it works or not. –  BalusC Dec 19 '09 at 12:32

px has the same problem as em that you mention with different monitor sizes. With px there's also more of a tendency to think in terms of pixels as they are sized on your monitor (that is, pixels having a certain dot pitch). Since ems (and %) don't have a fixed size relationship to displays, people don't fall into the same trap. (px, like all image pixels, don't really have a fixed 1:1 relationship to display pixels, but people usually think of them that way.)

When it comes to aligning replaced elements, whether Flash or images, px are indeed more appropriate (though Flash, when using purely vector graphics, will scale nicely to whatever size using whatever units you want). Personally, I use whatever unit is more natural for the type of element that's determining positioning and sizing: px for images & movies, em for text, % for the viewport.

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Now that modern desktop browsers scale px and em the same, I think the discussion should move to how the use of one or the other will display on mobile devices such as the iPad, iPhone, etc.

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Pixels are relative to the device. On most desktop browsers, that's 1:1. On some mobile devices that's 1.5:1. –  webinista Jul 23 '11 at 0:23

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