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Original question and simple algorithm

Given a set of relations such as

a < c
b < c
b < d < e

what is the most efficient algorithm to find a set of integers starting with 0 (and with as many repeated integers as possible!) that matches the set of relations, i.e. in this case

a = 0; b = 0; c = 1; d = 1; e = 2

The trivial algorithm is to repeatedly iterate over the set of relations and increasing values as necessary until convergence is reached, as implemented below in Python:

relations = [('a', 'c'), ('b', 'c'), ('b', 'd', 'e')]

print(relations)
values = dict.fromkeys(set(sum(relations, ())), 0)

print(values)
converged = False
while not converged:
    converged = True
    for relation in relations:
        for i in range(1,len(relation)):
            if values[relation[i]] <= values[relation[i-1]]:
                converged = False
                values[relation[i]] += values[relation[i-1]]-values[relation[i]]+1
    print(values)

Aside from the O(Relations²) complexity (if I'm not mistaken), this algorithm also goes into an infinite loop if an invalid relation is given (such as adding e < d). Detecting such a failure case is not strictly necessary for my use case, but would be a nice bonus.

Python implementation based on Tim Peter's comments

relations = [('a', 'c'), ('b', 'c'), ('b', 'd'), ('b', 'e'), ('d', 'e')]

symbols = set(sum(relations, ()))
numIncoming = dict.fromkeys(symbols, 0)
values = {}

for rel in relations:
    numIncoming[rel[1]] += 1

k = 0
n = len(symbols)
c = 0
while k < n:
    curs = [sym for sym in symbols if numIncoming[sym] == 0]
    curr = [rel for rel in relations if rel[0] in curs]
    for sym in curs:
        symbols.remove(sym)
        values[sym] = c
    for rel in curr:
        relations.remove(rel)
        numIncoming[rel[1]] -= 1
    c += 1
    k += len(curs)
print(values)

At the moment it requires the relations to be "split" (b < d and d < e instead of b < d < e), but detection of loops is easy (whenever curs is empty and k < n) and it should be possible to implement it somewhat more efficiently (especially how curs and curr are determined)

Worst case timing (1000 elements, 999 relations, reverse order):

Version A: 0.944926519991
Version B: 0.115537379751

Best case timing (1000 elements, 999 relations, forward order):

Version A: 0.00497004507556
Version B: 0.102511841589

Average case timing (1000 elements, 999 relations, random order):

Version A: 0.487685376214
Version B: 0.109792166323

Test data can be generated via

n = 1000
relations_worst = list((a, b) for a, b in zip(range(n)[::-1][1:], range(n)[::-1]))
relations_best = list(relations_worst[::-1])
relations_avg = shuffle(relations_worst)

C++ implementation based on Tim Peter's answer (simplified for symbols [0, n) )

vector<unsigned> chunked_topsort(const vector<vector<unsigned>>& relations, unsigned n)
{
    vector<unsigned> ret(n);
    vector<set<unsigned>> succs(n);
    vector<unsigned> npreds(n);

    set<unsigned> allelts;
    set<unsigned> nopreds;

    for(auto i = n; i--;)
        allelts.insert(i);

    for(const auto& r : relations)
    {
        auto u = r[0];
        if(npreds[u] == 0) nopreds.insert(u);
        for(size_t i = 1; i < r.size(); ++i)
        {
            auto v = r[i];
            if(npreds[v] == 0) nopreds.insert(v);
            if(succs[u].count(v) == 0)
            {
                succs[u].insert(v);
                npreds[v] += 1;
                nopreds.erase(v);
            }
            u = v;
        }
    }

    set<unsigned> next;
    unsigned chunk = 0;
    while(!nopreds.empty())
    {
        next.clear();
        for(const auto& u : nopreds)
        {
            ret[u] = chunk;
            allelts.erase(u);
            for(const auto& v : succs[u])
            {
                npreds[v] -= 1;
                if(npreds[v] == 0)
                    next.insert(v);
            }
        }
        swap(nopreds, next);
        ++chunk;
    }

    assert(allelts.empty());

    return ret;
}

C++ implementation with improved cache locality

vector<unsigned> chunked_topsort2(const vector<vector<unsigned>>& relations, unsigned n)
{
    vector<unsigned> ret(n);
    vector<unsigned> npreds(n);

    vector<tuple<unsigned, unsigned>> flat_relations; flat_relations.reserve(relations.size());
    vector<unsigned> relation_offsets(n+1);

    for(const auto& r : relations)
    {
        if(r.size() < 2) continue;
        for(size_t i = 0; i < r.size()-1; ++i)
        {
            assert(r[i] < n && r[i+1] < n);
            flat_relations.emplace_back(r[i], r[i+1]);
            relation_offsets[r[i]+1] += 1;
            npreds[r[i+1]] += 1;
        }
    }
    partial_sum(relation_offsets.begin(), relation_offsets.end(), relation_offsets.begin());
    sort(flat_relations.begin(), flat_relations.end());

    vector<unsigned> nopreds;
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < n; ++i)
        if(npreds[i] == 0)
            nopreds.push_back(i);

    vector<unsigned> next;
    unsigned chunk = 0;
    while(!nopreds.empty())
    {
        next.clear();
        for(const auto& u : nopreds)
        {
            ret[u] = chunk;
            for(unsigned i = relation_offsets[u]; i < relation_offsets[u+1]; ++i)
            {
                auto v = std::get<1>(flat_relations[i]);
                npreds[v] -= 1;
                if(npreds[v] == 0)
                    next.push_back(v);
            }
        }
        swap(nopreds, next);
        ++chunk;
    }

    assert(all_of(npreds.begin(), npreds.end(), [](unsigned i) { return i == 0; }));

    return ret;
}

C++ timings 10000 elements, 9999 relations, averaged over 1000 runs

"Worst case":

chunked_topsort: 4.21345 ms
chunked_topsort2: 1.75062 ms

"Best case":

chunked_topsort: 4.27287 ms
chunked_topsort2: 0.541771 ms

"Average case":

chunked_topsort: 6.44712 ms
chunked_topsort2: 0.955116 ms

Unlike the Python version the C++ chunked_topsort depends significantly on the order of the elements. Interestingly, the random order / average case is by far the slowest (with the set-based chunked_topsort).

share|improve this question
3  
Look up "topological sort" to impose a linear order across all the relations. This is very efficient. Then the rest is easy ;-) –  Tim Peters Oct 11 '13 at 22:06
    
That sounds pretty much like what I was looking for. In fact while thinking about it I was already drawing DAGs for the relations. –  Joe Oct 11 '13 at 22:08
3  
not exactly the same, but use some imagination ;-) That is, when a topsort is peeling off "the next" element, it's generally picking from a set of elements with no predecessors. All of those can be assigned to the same integer. That is, you need to modify a classic topsort algorithm. –  Tim Peters Oct 11 '13 at 22:19
1  
In your example, initially a and b have no predecessors, so they can both be set to 0. Remove them, then c and d have no predecessors, so they can both be set to 1. Then only e remains, so set it to 2. Done :-) –  Tim Peters Oct 11 '13 at 22:20
1  
Lack of imagination is what you get for coding after midnight ;) –  Joe Oct 11 '13 at 22:50
show 3 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's an implementation I didn't have time to post before:

def chunked_topsort(relations):
    # `relations` is an iterable producing relations.
    # A relation is a sequence, interpreted to mean
    # relation[0] < relation[1] < relation[2] < ...
    # The result is a list such that
    # result[i] is the set of elements assigned to i.
    from collections import defaultdict
    succs = defaultdict(set)    # new empty set is default
    npreds = defaultdict(int)   # 0 is default
    allelts = set()
    nopreds = set()

    def add_elt(u):
        allelts.add(u)
        if npreds[u] == 0:
            nopreds.add(u)

    for r in relations:
        u = r[0]
        add_elt(u)
        for i in range(1, len(r)):
            v = r[i]
            add_elt(v)
            if v not in succs[u]:
                succs[u].add(v)
                npreds[v] += 1
                nopreds.discard(v)
            u = v
    result = []
    while nopreds:
        result.append(nopreds)
        allelts -= nopreds
        next_nopreds = set()
        for u in nopreds:
            for v in succs[u]:
                npreds[v] -= 1
                assert npreds[v] >= 0
                if npreds[v] == 0:
                    next_nopreds.add(v)
        nopreds = next_nopreds
    if allelts:
        raise ValueError("elements in cycles %s" % allelts)
    return result

Then, e.g.,

>>> print chunked_topsort(['ac', 'bc', 'bde', 'be', 'fbcg'])
[set(['a', 'f']), set(['b']), set(['c', 'd']), set(['e', 'g'])]

Hope that helps. Note that there's no searching here of any kind (e.g., no conditional list comprehensions). That makes it theoretically ;-) efficient.

Later: timing

On the test data generated near the end of your post, chunked_topsort() is pretty much insensitive to the ordering of the inputs. That's not really surprising, since the algorithm only iterates over the inputs once to build its (inherently unordered) dicts and sets. In all, it's about 15 to 20 times faster than Version B. Typical timing output from 3 runs:

worst chunked  0.007 B  0.129 B/chunked  19.79
best  chunked  0.007 B  0.110 B/chunked  16.85
avg   chunked  0.006 B  0.118 B/chunked  19.06

worst chunked  0.007 B  0.127 B/chunked  18.25
best  chunked  0.006 B  0.103 B/chunked  17.16
avg   chunked  0.006 B  0.119 B/chunked  18.86

worst chunked  0.007 B  0.132 B/chunked  20.20
best  chunked  0.007 B  0.105 B/chunked  16.04
avg   chunked  0.007 B  0.113 B/chunked  17.32

With simpler data structures

Given that the problem has changed ;-), here's a rewrite that assumes inputs are integers in range(n), and that n is also passed. No sets, no dicts, and no dynamic allocations after the initial pass over the input relations. In Python, this is about 40% faster than chunked_topsort() on the test data. But I'm too old to wrestle with C++ anymore ;-)

def ct_special(relations, n):
    # `relations` is an iterable producing relations.
    # A relation is a sequence, interpreted to mean
    # relation[0] < relation[1] < relation[2] < ...
    # All elements are in range(n).
    # The result is a vector of length n such that
    # result[i] is the ordinal assigned to i, or
    # result[i] is -1 if i didn't appear in the relations.
    succs = [[] for i in xrange(n)]
    npreds = [-1] * n
    nopreds = [-1] * n
    numnopreds = 0

    def add_elt(u):
        if not 0 <= u < n:
            raise ValueError("element %s out of range" % u)
        if npreds[u] < 0:
            npreds[u] = 0

    for r in relations:
        u = r[0]
        add_elt(u)
        for i in range(1, len(r)):
            v = r[i]
            add_elt(v)
            succs[u].append(v)
            npreds[v] += 1
            u = v

    result = [-1] * n
    for u in xrange(n):
        if npreds[u] == 0:
            nopreds[numnopreds] = u
            numnopreds += 1

    ordinal = nopreds_start = 0
    while nopreds_start < numnopreds:
        next_nopreds_start = numnopreds
        for i in xrange(nopreds_start, numnopreds):
            u = nopreds[i]
            result[u] = ordinal
            for v in succs[u]:
                npreds[v] -= 1
                assert npreds[v] >= 0
                if npreds[v] == 0:
                    nopreds[numnopreds] = v
                    numnopreds += 1
        nopreds_start = next_nopreds_start
        ordinal += 1
    if any(count > 0 for count in npreds):
        raise ValueError("elements in cycles")
    return result

This is again - in Python - insensitive to input ordering.

share|improve this answer
    
looks nice but a direct port to c++ (python is only for algorithmic prototyping in this case, which is why I also added the language-agnostic tag) doesn't perform too well due to too many memory allocations and bad cache locality of the sets. (the port is simplified in so far as the number of symbols is known and are just unsigned ints) –  Joe Oct 12 '13 at 10:38
    
the c++ version timings also significantly depend on the ordering of the inputs –  Joe Oct 12 '13 at 11:03
    
Added another version that sticks to nothing fancier than vectors ;-) –  Tim Peters Oct 12 '13 at 16:39
    
Thanks for the additional version, I'll mark the answer as accepted soon unless someone comes up with a better algorithm (unlikely). The problem hasn't really changed though, as any set of symbols can be mapped to integers ;) –  Joe Oct 12 '13 at 21:36
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